State of Relations, March 2016 : Relations, Contact and Perceptions of Religious, Aboriginal and Racial Groups in Canada

MONTREAL and TORONTO, March 21, 2016 /CNW/ - To mark the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration (a division of the Association for Canadian Studies) have released findings from a new national survey on people's attitudes towards religious, racial and aboriginal groups in Canada, relations between communities, as well as contact with selected minorities.

The survey of 1500 Canadians was conducted between March 1 and 3, 2016 by the firm Leger Marketing for the CRRF and CIIM. The results add to ongoing CRRF-CIIM surveys aimed at tracking public opinion on views around the perceived state of race relations in Canada. The results point to growing concerns particularly in Quebec around intergroup relations and notably between Muslims and non-Muslims and Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. See survey highlights below.

To view the detailed results of the survey by province/region, gender, age and other demographics go to www.crrf-fcrr.ca or www.acs-aec.ca.

The survey was conducted via web panel between March 1 and 3, 2016 with 1500 Canadians by Leger Marketing for the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration and the Canadian Race Relations Foundation.

Highlights

Opinion: The CRRF-CIIM tracking points to steady declines in positive views of Muslims amongst Canada's francophones since 2012. After a drop in positive views of Muslims amongst Canada's anglophones and allophones between 2012 and 2014, opinion returned to the earlier levels in the year 2016. Still, a majority of Canadians do not hold positive opinions of Muslims. Opinion of immigrants has remained fairly constant over the period with a slight decline observed amongst Canada's francophones. Opinion of Aboriginals has remained fairly constant over the period of 2012 to 2016. Opinion of Jews has also remained constant with a persistent gap between Canada's francophone and non-francophone population.

Net Positive Opinion of….

Survey Date

Total (%)

French (%)

English (%)

Other (%)

Immigrants

March 2012

68

64

66

79

March 2013

73

73

69

84

February 2014

66

67

65

72

September 2014

62

63

59

71

March 2016

61

54

61

75

Muslims

March 2012

46

35

53

43

March 2013

46

34

50

46

February 2014

42

29

46

42

September 2014

35

27

38

35

March 2016

43

24

49

47

Jews

March 2012

72

53

80

72

March 2013

69

57

76

63

February 2014

67

55

73

59

September 2014

64

57

70

55

March 2016

68

53

73

64

Catholics

March 2012

69

75

68

68

March 2013

70

80

68

67

February 2014

70

78

68

64

March 2016

63

70

62

58

Protestants

March 2012

72

68

75

70

March 2013

74

76

77

64

February 2014

68

66

71

59

March 2016

56

45

60

58

Aboriginals

March 2012

65

61

68

62

March 2013

58

58

58

57

March 2016

61

61

61

60

Asian 

March 2016

72

71

72

78

Black

March 2016

76

81

75

72

Relations: In regards to views around relations between immigrants and non-immigrants, in March 2016 a slight majority of Canadians felt that relations were positive. Between 2012 and 2016 there has been a gradual decline in relations between Muslims and non-Muslims characterized by sizable erosion in the extent to which francophones view the relationship positively. A similar steep drop occurred amongst francophones and allophones in the degree to which relations between Jews and non-Jews are seen positively. Unlike the other relationships examined here, there was a significant rate of non-response when asked about relations between Jews and non-Jews. In regards to perceived relations between aboriginals and non-aboriginals, since 2013 there has been a very significant decline and the declines are particularly important amongst francophones and allophones.

Net Positive Opinion of…

Survey Date

Total (%)

French (%)

English (%)

Other (%)

Relations between Immigrants and non-Immigrants

February 2014

47

47

45

57

March 2016

52

47

52

60

Relations between Muslims and Non-Muslims

March 2012

38

25

44

38

March 2013

35

25

37

41

February 2014

40

37

40

47

September 2014

39

38

39

39

March 2015

36

38

36

34

March 2016

32

17

36

38

Relations between Jews and Non-Jews

February 2014

66

65

67

64

September 2014

65

70

66

58

March 2015

67

65

70

60

March 2016

52

44

59

47

Relations between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals

March 2013

43

42

43

45

March 2016

39

37

40

34

Contact: In regards to contact with selected groups, the survey reveals that in 2016 there are similar levels of contact between the population with Canadians of Aboriginal, Jewish and Muslim origins. But there are considerable differences in degrees of contact along language lines. Francophones have the least degree of contact with the groups, some of which is attributable to diverging patterns of geographic concentration. Anglophone Canadians have more contact with aboriginals while the country's allophones report greater contact with Muslims.

Often and Sometimes in Contact with …

Total (%)

French (%)

English (%)

Other (%)

Aboriginals

49

29

57

39

Muslims

52

36

55

65

Jews

48

25

55

51

SOURCE Canadian Race Relations Foundation

For further information: Anita Bromberg, Executive Director, Canadian Race Relations Foundation, 416-508-9033, 1-888-240-4936; Jack Jedwab, President, Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration, 514-240-9548

RELATED LINKS
http://www.crrf-fcrr.ca/en/

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