Series from The Lancet provides more evidence that breastfeeding is lifesaving - UNICEF

Reductions in child mortality and reduced breast and ovarian cancer rates for women who breastfeed

WASHINGTON/NEWYORK/TORONTO, Jan.29, 2016 /CNW/ - A new series of papers just published by The Lancet provides evidence that improving breastfeeding practices could save the lives of over 820,000 children a year, nine out of ten of them infants under six months.

Increased breastfeeding can prevent nearly half of diarrhea episodes and a third of respiratory infections – the two leading causes of death among children under age five.

The Lancet papers also show that each year a mother breastfeeds, her risk of developing invasive breast cancer is reduced by six per cent. Current breastfeeding rates already prevent almost 20,000 deaths from breast cancer each year, a number which could be doubled with improved breastfeeding practices. Longer breastfeeding is also linked to a reduction in ovarian cancer.

"Investing in breastfeeding has a significant impact on the health of women and children and on the economies of both rich and poor countries," said UNICEF Chief of Nutrition Werner Schultink. "The Series provides crucial evidence for the case that breastfeeding is a cornerstone of children's survival, health, growth and development and contributes to a more prosperous and sustainable future."

Breastfeeding beneficial for low-, middle-, and high-income countries

The Lancet Series confirms the lifesaving benefits of breastfeeding for women and children in low-, middle- and high-income countries alike, UNICEF said.

Breastfeeding lowers child mortality in high income countries. It is associated with a 36 per cent reduction in sudden infant deaths and an almost 60 per cent decline in the most common intestinal disease among premature infants. A child who breastfeeds for longer also has a reduced risk of becoming overweight or obese later in life.

The Lancet Series found that cognitive losses associated with not breastfeeding, which impact earning potential, amount to $302 billion annually. Low- and middle- income countries lose more than $70 billion annually, while high income countries lose more than $230 billion annually due to low rates of breastfeeding.

UNICEF said the multiple advantages in terms of health for mothers and children, as well as potential economic gains, should impel governments to institute policies and programs to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.

Working mothers face greater difficulties to breastfeed

This is especially important for working mothers. While early return to work tends to lessen the chances that a mother will breastfeed, in roughly 60 per cent of countries, maternity leave does not reach the ILO recommended minimum of 14 weeks paid leave. When breastfeeding mothers do return to work, their places of employment lack facilities for them to breastfeed or express milk.

UNICEF's Schultink reiterated The Lancet's conclusion that improving breastfeeding rates is a fundamental driver in achieving many of the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly those related to health, child survival and education.

"Breastfeeding is the most natural, cost effective, environmentally sound and readily available way we know to provide all children, rich or poor, with the healthiest start in life," he said. "It's a win-win for all concerned to make it a priority."

Notes to Editors

UNICEF experts are among the authors of The Lancet's Breastfeeding Series, which will launch on Friday, 29 January 2016, at 10:00 a.m. at the Kaiser Family Foundation Conference Center, 1330 G Street, NW, Washington, D.C

About UNICEF

UNICEF has saved more children's lives than any other humanitarian organization. We work tirelessly to help children and their families, doing whatever it takes to ensure children survive. We provide children with healthcare and immunization, clean water, nutrition and food security, education, emergency relief and more.

UNICEF is supported entirely by voluntary donations and helps children regardless of race, religion or politics. As part of the UN, we are active in over 190 countries - more than any other organization. Our determination and our reach are unparalleled. Because nowhere is too far to go to help a child survive. For more information about UNICEF, please visit www.unicef.ca. For updates, follow us on Twitter and Facebook or visit unicef.ca.

SOURCE UNICEF Canada

Image with caption: "UNICEF Canada (CNW Group/UNICEF Canada)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20160129_C5466_PHOTO_EN_608826.jpg

For further information: To arrange interviews or for more information please contact: Tiffany Baggettam, UNICEF Canada, 416-482-6552 ext. 8892, 647-308-4806 (mobile), tbaggetta@unicef.ca; Stefanie Carmichael, UNICEF Canada, 416-482-6552 ext. 8866, 647-500-4230 (mobile), scarmichael@unicef.ca

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