Quebec farmers are invited to safely dispose of their obsolete pesticides and animal medications

SAINT-BRUNO-DE-MONTARVILLE, QC, Sept. 30, 2014 /CNW/ - Farmers in Quebec are being invited to safely and responsibly dispose of their unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock (including equine) medications from September 30 to October 11.

CleanFARMS, an industry-led, national not-for-profit agricultural waste management organization, in partnership with the Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) is offering the program, which comes at no charge to farmers, this fall.

"The Canadian Animal Health Institute's participation in this program is just one part of our industry's commitment to safely managing animal medications throughout their lifecycle," said Jean Szkotnicki, President of CAHI.  "Our members are happy to be able to provide Saskatchewan's livestock and equine community with this service."

Quebec farmers have a long history of good stewardship practices. Last year, CleanFARMS partnered with L'Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA) to offer a province-wide collection program at 11 ag-retail locations. In total, 51,047 kilograms of obsolete pesticides were collected and safely disposed of during the campaign.

"This program offers a concrete solution for safe disposal of products that could otherwise be harmful to the environment. In this sense, it satisfies a real need and will, over time, become an almost-essential service," said Marcel Groleau, president of "'Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA). "Once again, the Union is proud to be associated with the obsolete collections campaign and welcomes agricultural producers to do their part for the environment through participating, in large numbers, in this provincial campaign."

After collection, the pesticides are taken to a licensed waste management facility where they are disposed of through high temperature incineration.

The following locations will be accepting obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.:

Abitibi/Outaouais

  • Thurso, September 30, October 1-2 La Coop Agrodor
  • Ville-Marie, September 30, October 1-2

La Coop Van Nord

  • Amos, September 30, October 1-2 La Coop Val Nord

Bas Saint-Laurent/Gaspesie

  • Amqui, September 30, October 1-2: La Coop Matapedienne
  • Sanit-Philippe-de-Neri, October 9: Dynaco

Capitale-National/Mauricie

  • Saint-Casimir, October 3: La Coop Univert
  • St.Augustin-de-Desmaures, October 7 Synagri
  • Saint-Hyacinthe, September 30 La Coop Comax
  • Napierville, October 2 La Coop Uniforce
  • Granby, October 8 La Coop Monteregienne
  • Saint-Clet, October 9 Synagri
  • St-Remi, October 9 AgroCentre St-Remi

Lanaudiere

  • St-Thomas-de-Joliette, October 1 AgroCentre Lanaudiere
  • Mirabel, October 8 Meunerie, Mondou

Centre-du-Quebec/Chaudiere/Estrie

  • Saint-Narcisse-de-Beaurivage, October 8 La Coop Seigneurie
  • Victoriaville, October 2 La Coop des Bois Franc
  • Coaticook, October 7 Centre Vegetal Coop de L'estrie

Saguenay

  • Normandin, September 30-October 2, October 7 La Coop des Deux Rives
  • Saint-Bruno-Lac-Saint-Jean, October 7 Synagri

Pomiculture

  • Rougemont, September 9-11 Centre Agricole Bienvenue

The obsolete collection program is a national program that comes to each province on a three-year rotating basis. In between collection periods, farmers are asked to safely store their unwanted pesticides and livestock medications until they can properly dispose of them through the program.

Backgrounder

The obsolete pesticide collection program was launched by industry in 1998 as part of its commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of its products. In 2010, CleanFARMS was formed to manage several industry-funded agricultural waste management programs, including the obsolete pesticide collection program. The collection of obsolete medications for livestock and horses has been added to the obsolete collections campaign for the first time this year (2014).

What are pesticides and livestock medications?

Pesticides are registered substances regulated by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that are used to control pest pressures, including fungi, insects and weeds, that can cause damage to crops.

Similar to pesticides, animal health products are regulated by Health Canada or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.  These products are used by veterinarians and animal owners to prevent, manage or treat pests and disease.

What kinds of products are collected?

All liquid and dry/granular commercially labelled pesticides. They come in various sizes and types of containers from as small as 250 ml up to 500 L totes. They may also include products in multi-walled paper and plastic bags. The products are mainly for farm use but may also include obsolete pesticides from golf courses, commercial landscape, vegetative management and structural pest control operations.

Animal health products are quite similar in the relatively wide range of products that may be included in the collection that are labelled as a livestock or equine medication. The products may come in various container sizes and types from as small as 100 ml to 20 L pails or in plastic, glass, paper/plastic bags, tubes or blister packs.

Why do obsolete products exist?

Obsolete products can result due to a number of different reasons.  These may include:

  • Farmers or applicators may have saved product one year and decided to use a new product the next year;
  • A farmer may have leftover pesticides from previous years that has become de-registered and no longer legal for use;
  • Farm ownership can change leaving the new owner with leftover product on site;
  • Farmers may start growing different crops that require different pest control products than what they currently have; and
  • Pest pressures can change from when farmers first purchase products leaving them with unusable products leftover.
  • Animal health products may have exceeded their expiry date, been accidently frozen (or exposed to excessive heat) causing the product to be ineffective.  Similarly an animal's treatment course may have been altered / ended prematurely resulting in leftover product.

How are obsolete products handled and destroyed after they have been returned?

Obsolete pesticides and livestock medications returned during the collection process are safely packed in leak-proof containers and transported by a licensed and insured hazardous waste hauler. When properly packaged and handled by trained professionals, these products do not pose a health and safety risk.

All products are safely disposed using specialized high-temperature incineration, which is the most environmentally responsible disposal option. The incineration facility that CleanFARMS normally uses is approved by Environment Canada and is located in northern Alberta. It is a world-class facility developed and built specifically for the management of hazardous waste.

What safety measures are in place to manage potential spills?

CleanFARMS and its licensed waste contractors have very detailed emergency response plans in place to manage any accidents or spills that may occur. Since the program began in 1998, there have not been any spills or accidents.

Backgrounder

The obsolete pesticide collection program was launched by industry in 1998 as part of its commitment to the responsible lifecycle management of its products. In 2010, CleanFARMS was formed to manage industry-funded agricultural waste management programs, including the obsolete pesticide collection program.

What are pesticides?

Pesticides are substances registered by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that are used to control pest pressures, including fungi, insects and weeds, that can cause damage to crops.

What kinds of products are collected?

We collect all liquid and dry granular commercially labeled pesticides. They come in all sizes and types of containers from as small as 250 millilitres up to 500 litre totes. They can also include products delivered in multi-walled paper and plastic bags. The products are mainly for farm use but may also include obsolete pesticides from golf courses, commercial landscape operations and structural pest control.

Why do obsolete pesticides exist?

Farmers and applicators can generate obsolete pesticides for a number of different reasons, including:

  • They may have saved product one year and decided to use a new product the next year;
  • A farmer may have leftover pesticides from previous years that has become de-registered and no longer legal for use;
  • Farm ownership can change leaving the new owner with leftover product on site;
  • Farmers may start growing different crops that require different pest control products than what they currently have; and
  • Pest pressures can change from when farmers first purchase products leaving them with unusable products leftover.

How are obsolete products handled and destroyed after they have been returned?

All products are safely disposed using specialized high-temperature incineration, which is the most environmentally responsible disposal option. The incineration facility that CleanFARMS normally uses is approved by Environment Canada and is located in northern Alberta. It is a world-class facility developed and built specifically for the management of hazardous waste.

Obsolete pesticides returned during the collection process are safely packed in leak-proof containers and transported by a licensed and insured hazardous waste hauler. When properly packaged and handled by trained professionals, these products do not pose a health and safety risk.

What safety measures are in place to manage potential spills?

CleanFARMS and its contractors have very detailed emergency response plans in place to manage any accidents or spills that may occur. Since the program began in 1998, there have not been any spills or accidents.

SOURCE: CleanFARMS Inc.

For further information:

please contact:
Christine Lajuenesse, agr., AgriRÉCUP
(450) 482-0756 | lajeunessec@agrirecup.ca


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