Now on J-Source: Newspapers rise again; protecting whistleblowers; gunman
calls Edmonton newsroom

TORONTO, Oct. 28 /CNW/ - "Now on J-Source" is the free weekly newsletter of J-Source.ca (http://j-source.ca), a website project of the Canadian Journalism Project (CJP), featuring Canadian journalism facts, opinions, tools, advice and connections.

    
    Here's a sampling from this week's issue.

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    Now on J-Source
    October 27 to November 2, 2009

    TWITTER: http://twitter.com/jsource
    RSS: http://jsource.ca/english_new/rss.php

    IN THE NEWS
    (xx)Montreal entrepreneur sues Radio-Canada(xx)
    (xx)Canadian groups launch petition for kidnapped journalist(xx)
    (xx)Rogers buys stake in web video company(xx)
    (xx)Journalism students and their course under legal scrutiny(xx)
    (xx)Nonprofit news venture in Chicago signs up New York Times(xx)
    (xx)CJFE honours journalists and newspaper with Press Freedom Awards(xx)

    FEATURES

    THE BUSINESS OF JOURNALISM
    (xx)Good news - yes, good news - for newspapers(xx)
    Canwest newspapers are making money, the circulation slide may be over
    and newspaper stocks are outperforming the Toronto Stock Exchange, writes
    Kelly Toughill. Who knew?

    FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
    (xx)Supreme Court rulings could clarify the right to protect
    whistleblowers(xx)
    "Canada's highest court reserved its decision in the second of two cases
    that could affect journalists' right to protect their sources.
    Grant Buckler examines the cases in Freedom of Expression and Cecil
    Rosner looks at the importance of whistleblowers in Investigative
    Journalism.

    TOWN HALL
    (xx)Live blogging the relaunch of CBC's The National(xx)
    "It really feels like CNN three years ago, except everyone is standing
    up," noted Howard Bernstein, one of our live bloggers during the big
    relaunch of CBC News. Read more from Suanne Kelman, Robert Washburn,
    Susan Newhook, Jeffrey Dvorkin and J-Source readers.

    THE FUTURE OF JOURNALISM
    (xx)10 ideas for change(xx)
    Online journalism professor Tim Currie attended the 2009 Joseph Howe
    Symposium on the future of news at the University of King's College in
    Halifax and pulled together ten ideas for change. Here's what the experts
    want to see more of.
    //

    Subscribe now and receive "Now on J-Source" on its publication date (every
Tuesday) plus this additional content:

    (xx) reader comments (xx)
    (xx) big issue of the week (xx)
    (xx) cross-country events calendar (xx)
    (xx) more news and recent posts (xx)
    http://www.j-source.ca/english_new/page.php?p=26
    

ABOUT THE CANADIAN JOURNALISM PROJECT:

The Canadian Journalism Project (CJP) and its websites, J-Source.ca (English) and ProjetJ.ca (French), are projects of The Canadian Journalism Foundation in collaboration with leading journalism schools and organizations across Canada. The goal of the CJP is to enable a national conversation about the achievement of, and challenges to, excellence in Canadian journalism and provide a convenient and trustworthy source of information and commentary.

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For further information: For further information: The Canadian Journalism Foundation, La Fondation pour le journalisme canadien, 117 Peter St., 3rd floor, Toronto, ON, M5V 2G9, http://www.cjf-fjc.ca/programs.htm


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