Canadians with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis participate in "six-minute marathon" to raise awareness of rare, but fatal lung disease[1]

Participants encourage others with the disease to learn more and stay active longer

TORONTO, June 21, 2016 /CNW/ - While many Canadians are lacing up their running shoes this summer to participate in local walks, runs and marathons, people living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) will face a different reality. Pulmonary fibrosis causes irreversible and worsening scarring of the lungs which deprives the body of oxygen2, eventually making everyday tasks impossible. For people with IPF, something as simple as a six-minute walk can feel like a marathon.

This month, Canadians living with IPF across the country are stepping up to the cause and participating in a "six-minute marathon" to raise awareness of this rare, but fatal lung disease.1 Respirologists sometimes use a six-minute walking test to help assess IPF, as well as to monitor how the disease is progressing over time.3,4

Ontarian, Jim Gillies, has been living with IPF for more than three years and knows first-hand the impact this disease has on quality of life. Jim has learned the importance of managing the disease – working closely with his doctor on a treatment plan and keeping fit by swimming, cycling and golfing has helped him maintain lung function and stay active.5,6 To help raise awareness of IPF, the symptoms and the importance of treatment options, Jim will be participating this Saturday in the Toronto Waterfront 10, in downtown Toronto, and is hoping the community will come out to learn more!

WHAT:    

IPF awareness – interview/photo opportunity. This is not a fundraising event; Jim is a participant in the running series event, doing his own six-minute marathon.



WHEN:       

Saturday, June 25 at 7:30 a.m.



WHO:           

Dr. Shane Shapera, Toronto, is available for interviews this week. Dr. Shapera's patient, Jim Gillies, is available for interviews this week, including June 25.



WHERE:       

University Ave., between Dundas and Queen, Toronto, ON

 

About IPF
Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) affects an estimated 30,000 Canadians and is responsible for 5,000 deaths each year. IPF is the most common form of PF.2 Every year, 6,000 people are diagnosed with PF and this number is expected to increase as the population ages.7 There is no known cause of IPF2, and by the time symptoms appear, the lungs have already been damaged.8 As the disease progresses, everyday tasks such as climbing stairs or getting dressed can become difficult, and eventually, oxygen therapy will be needed.8 Typical symptoms include: shortness of breath; a dry, hacking cough; loss of appetite; rapid weight loss; extreme tiredness and loss of energy; chest discomfort; coldness in the hands and feet; and memory loss.8 Early diagnosis and treatment can help slow progression of the disease.5,6

___________________________

1 Costabel, Ulrich. The changing treatment landscape in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. European Respiratory Review. 2015;24:65-68.

2 Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patient Information Guide. What is Pulmonary Fibrosis? Accessed April 19, 2016. Available at:
http://cpff.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/IPF_Guide_2012_Final_V1.1_2015MAY01.pdf

3 Du Bois, Roland M, et al. 6-minute walk distance is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. European Respiratory Journal. 2014;43:1421-1429.

4 Du Bois, Roland M, et al. Six-minute-walk test in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2011; 183:1231-1237.

5 Canadian Lung Association. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis – Treatment. Accessed on April 19, 2016. Available at http://www.lung.ca/lung-health/lung-disease/idiopathic-pulmonary-fibrosis/treatment.

6 Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patient Information Guide. What You Can Do. Accessed April 19, 2016. Available at:
http://cpff.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/IPF_Guide_2012_Final_V1.1_2015MAY01.pdf.

7 Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patient Information Guide. How Many People Have It? Accessed April 19, 2016. Available at:
http://cpff.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/IPF_Guide_2012_Final_V1.1_2015MAY01.pdf.

8 Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patient Information Guide. What Are The Symptoms? Accessed April 19, 2016. Available at:
http://cpff.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/IPF_Guide_2012_Final_V1.1_2015MAY01.pdf.

 

SOURCE Roche Canada

For further information: or to arrange an interview, please contact: Lisa Cancian, Weber Shandwick, Tel: 416-894-2947, E-mail: lcancian@webershandwick.com


Custom Packages

Browse our custom packages or build your own to meet your unique communications needs.

Start today.

CNW Membership

Fill out a CNW membership form or contact us at 1 (877) 269-7890

Learn about CNW services

Request more information about CNW products and services or call us at 1 (877) 269-7890