Canada Needs Sharper Game in International Trade Arena - C.D. Howe Institute



    TORONTO, Aug. 16 /CNW/ - When nailing down Canada's trade agenda, says an
e-brief from the C.D. Howe Institute, Ottawa needs to show more courage and
sharper elbows. In "Stuck on a Spoke: Proliferating Bilateral Trade Deals are
a Dangerous Game for Canada," William B.P. Robson, President and CEO at the
Institute, argues that Canada must take aggressive action to protect itself
from losing its privileged trade position with the United States.
    Although multilateral trade liberalization remains the first and best
strategy, the turmoil in the Doha Round of negotiations at the World Trade
Organization - and agricultural protectionism at home - put multilateral
progress in doubt. Meanwhile, a recent tide of bilateral deals between the
United States and other advanced countries threatens to erode the advantages
of Canada's most important trading relationship. Robson argues that rather
than haphazardly pursuing bilateral deals, Canada needs to take immediate
steps to ensure that the hard won advantages of access to the U.S. market are
preserved - by pursuing further reductions of economic barriers and by
negotiating our way into future U.S. bilateral trade deals. Without action,
Canada risks becoming a spoke to the U.S. hub, reducing the competitiveness of
Canadian industry and ultimately threatening our prosperity.

    The study is available at http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/ebrief_47.pdf




For further information:

For further information: William Robson, President and Chief Executive
Officer, C.D. Howe Institute, (416) 865-1904 (email cdhowe@cdhowe.org). Finn
Poschmann, Director of Research, C.D. Howe Institute, (416) 865-1904 (email
cdhowe@cdhowe.org)


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