The most liberal Republican president in history: this week in Maclean's



    
    Trying to untangle George W. Bush's complex presidency will have
    historians scratching their heads for decades to come. But one thing is
    for sure: He's one of the most liberal Republican presidents in history.

    Also in this week's issue: Maj.-Gen. Lewis MacKenzie speaks out on
    Roméo Dallaire's deadly error in Rwanda; Canadian men's eight rowing team
    traversed some rough water on their way to Olympic glory; and CW's series
    90210 is supposed to be a new, edgy 2008 teen drama - so why all the
    soppy Dylan-and-Donna nostalgia?
    

    TORONTO, Aug. 21 /CNW/ - George Bush expanded presidential powers, eroded
civil liberties, cut taxes, fought a pre-emptive war and authorized
interrogation techniques that amount to torture. But on closer look, part of
his legacy is surprisingly, shockingly liberal: He grew the federal government
in size and expense; he did more than any president before him to track and
invest in the achievement of black and Latino children; and he was an eloquent
advocate of human dignity. Yet, this passionate champion of liberty
circumvented laws to spy on his own citizens, and this lover of freedom
toppled one dictator while propping up others. And those contradictions are
just for starters. What will the history books make of this chameleon
president?

    Dallaire's Deadly Error

    In an excerpt from his forthcoming memoirs Soldiers Made Me Look Good,
retired Maj.-Gen. Lewis MacKenzie, UN commander in Sarajevo during the Bosnian
civil war, offers a harsh critique of Maj.-Gen. Roméo Dallaire's leadership
during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Dallaire is a tragic hero to many Canadians,
but MacKenzie argues that Dallaire's concept of military leadership - a
mission-first commitment even when his mission was no longer viable, to the
detriment of the men under his command - proved to be "dangerously bad."

    Olympics: On golden pond

    They toiled through snow, rain and much pain over the last four years of
training in Victoria on their way to winning gold in Beijing. But the men's
eight boat is more than a rowing team. They're a brotherhood of plucky
survivors who, luckily, had Tylenol as a sponsor.

    Same postal code, different show?

    It's a brand-new series, but you wouldn't know it. All the marketing hype
surrounding 90210, a redux of the 1990s Beverly Hills: 90210, is focused on
Jennie Garth, who reprises her role as Kelly (now a school guidance counselor
at West Beverly High) and Shannen Doherty who plays Brenda, (once again
Kelly's conniving romantic rival), along with other potential original-show
guest stars. The show's new teen stars are so far all but invisible. So is
this show the new Gossip Girl? Or a Gen-X Peach Pit flashback?

    About Maclean's:

    Maclean's is Canada's only national weekly current affairs magazine.
Maclean's enlightens, engages and entertains 2.8 million readers with strong
investigative reporting and exclusive stories from leading journalists in the
fields of international affairs, social issues, national politics, business
and culture. Visit www.macleans.ca.





For further information:

For further information: Louise Leger, Public Relations Consultant,
Rogers Consumer Publishing, (416) 764-4125, louise.leger@rci.rogers.com

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