Our kids are growing up with porn



    Parents are shocked by what their kids see, but what's being done to stop
    it? Also in this week's issue of Maclean's: Don't call me McBush, and
    Fish fraud - do you know what you're eating? For information on these and
    other stories turn to www.macleans.ca.

    TORONTO, June 19 /CNW/ - Nothing compares to the Wild West of cyberporn.
There's been an explosion of pornographic websites in the last decade, with
tens of millions of sites literally a click away. More than just big business,
this wave of easy-to-access online images, videos and chat rooms is shaping
the way young people indulge their sexual curiosity. Back when parents of
today's teens were growing up, porn meant girlie magazines like Playboy or
Hustler. And accessing porn took effort - and courage. Curious teens had to
sneak into their older brothers' bedrooms - or their dads' tool sheds - to
find their secret stashes. Today, airbrushed Playboy playmates are tame
compared to what's out there: oral sex, anal sex, same-sex sex, sex with
animals and vegetables, ménages à trois, quatre and many more - all of this
going on right under the parental roof. Although it's hard to quantify exactly
what and how much online porn kids are looking at, a report from the London
School of Economics found that nine out of 10 children between the ages of
eight and 16 have viewed at least something that qualifies. According to a
2004 Columbia University study, 25 per cent of 12- and 13-year-old girls, and
37 per cent of boys the same age, say they have friends who regularly view and
download Internet pornography.
    So what exactly are Canadian authorities doing to protect kids from the
onslaught? In 1999, the CRTC made a pivotal decision to let the Internet run
wild, figuratively speaking, exempting so-called "new media" from the sorts of
standards it requires of mainstream broadcasters. According to new media
scholars, it's near impossible to regulate such a vast and uncontrollable
medium. Parents, in other words, can fend for themselves.

    Fish Fraud

    More than three quarters of the world's main fish-catch species are
either fully exploited or tapped out, according to the United Nations. And,
according to another survey, 90 per cent of the ocean's largest predators
-tuna, cod, flounder and the like - have been killed off since 1950. An
oft-quoted 2006 report in the journal Science forewarned a total global
fishery collapse by 2048 if aquatic plundering continued at current rates.
Rising awareness of the dire health of the aquatic ecosystem has made
"sustainable" becoming the latest buzzword in the imperilled-food chain
lexicon, prompting the fishery industry to follow suit. But with 25% of
Canadian fish fillets mislabeled in stores, the waters are treacherous when
buying sustainable fish. Maclean's makes sense of the murkiness, in this
week's issue.

    Don't call him McBush

    If John McCain ran with the same strategy George W. Bush used in 2004,
he'd get slaughtered. The Republican brand has been so tarnished by deficit
spending and unfinished wars that a recent poll by NBC News and the Wall
Street Journal this month found that voters prefer putting a Democrat in the
White House over a Republican by 16 points. But if ever there was a Republican
who could transcend Republican woes, it is McCain, who despite drawing
history's short straw as so far managed to keep the race impressively close.

    About Maclean's: Maclean's is Canada's only national weekly current
affairs magazine. Maclean's enlightens, engages and entertains 2.8 million
readers with strong investigative reporting and exclusive stories from leading
journalists in the fields of international affairs, social issues, national
politics, business and culture. Visit www.macleans.ca.





For further information:

For further information: Media contact: Jacqueline Segal, (416)
764-4125, jacqueline.segal@rci.rogers.com

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