NexGen Discovers Off-Scale Radioactivity at Radon Anomaly 3.7 km Northeast from Arrow

 

VANCOUVER, March 31, 2015 /CNW/ - NexGen Energy Ltd. (TSX-V: NXE) ("NexGen" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that off-scale radioactivity (>10,000 cps) has been drilled approximately 3.7 km northeast and along trend from the Arrow zone on our 100% owned Rook I property, Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan.  This new discovery named "Bow" is coincident with a recently located radon anomaly that tracks the strike of a VTEM conductor for approximately 730 m, and is up to 140 m wide. This particular radon anomaly has the highest reading of all known radon anomalies in the area with a peak reading of 36.0 pCi/L, and is 80 m south of off-scale radioactivity drilled in hole BO-15-10.  A fourth drill rig was mobilized to the Rook I property, and has joined one other drill rig in testing this high priority area named the "Bow Discovery" (Figure 1).

This news release describes results from our Bow Discovery and radon in water surveys located along the 5 km northeast VTEM conductor along trend from Arrow.

Highlights:

  • Hole BO-15-10 intersected 2.5 m total composite mineralization including 0.10 m off-scale radioactivity (>10,000 to 10,200 cps) within a 5.0 m section (206.5 to 211.5 m) associated with veinlets, flecks and blebs of pitchblende within a sheared, strongly chlorite altered pelitic gneiss (mylonite).  BO-15-10 is a 66.0 m step out to the east of BO-15-02, where lake depths range between 2.1 to 2.2m;
  • BO-15-02 intersected 3.0 m discrete mineralization (202.0 to 205.0 m) from <500 to 1350 cps associated with a sheared, pyritic graphitic pelitic gneiss (mylonite);
  • Drill holes BO-15-02 and -10 targeted a coincident VTEM conductor and radon in lake water anomaly with a peak reading of 36.0 pCi/L (Figure 3);
  • Multiple radon anomalies have been discovered along the northeast 3.7 km VTEM conductor from Arrow, and on the parallel VTEM conductor to the north as shown in Figure 2. These radon anomalies are optimally situated along breaks and kinks in the VTEM conductors.
  • The 2015 winter drilling program has been expanded to a minimum 20,000 meters. Drilling will continue to focus on Arrow expansion at the two high grade core zones in A2 and A3, and on step outs from the discovery holes BO-15-02 and -10 at Bow.

Figure 2 shows radon in lake water results and drilling to the northeast of the Arrow zone.  Figure 3 shows the Bow Discovery drill hole locations and anomalous radon results.  Drill core photos of BO-15-10 are shown in Figures 4 and 5.  Drill hole details and spectrometer (handheld RS-120 scintillometer) results are summarized in Table 1.

Garrett Ainsworth, NexGen's Vice-President, Exploration and Development, commented "Drill holes BO-15-02 and -10 have already defined a 66 m strike length of mineralization at our Bow Discovery, which underpins the immense potential to discover additional mineralization to the northeast and along trend from the Arrow zone.  This successful step-out 3.7 km to the northeast of Arrow is a result of drill testing coincident VTEM and radon in lake water anomalies, which has proven to be effective when utilized in the appropriate geological setting in the Athabasca Basin.  The VTEM conductor that hosts Arrow extends for approximately 5 km to the northeast before reaching our claim boundary, and the NexGen team is very encouraged with this new discovery."

Leigh Curyer, Chief Executive Officer commented, "This new discovery of uranium mineralization at Bow is another significant step forward in unlocking the substantial prospectivity of the Rook I property. Coupled with the rapid development at Arrow discovered just over 12 months ago, it is incredibly exciting for shareholders to now have two discoveries developing in proximity to one another. I would like to take the opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of the entire team, including Board and Technical Committee members at NexGen, who have shown outstanding commitment and expertise to develop the Company into a premier exploration and development organization in such a relatively short period of time. Garrett Ainsworth, and his technical team continually demonstrate their expertise in making new discoveries and developing projects in a highly efficient and optimal manner."


Table 1: Bow Discovery Drill Hole Data

Drill Hole

Athabasca Group -
Basement
Unconformity
Depth (m)

Handheld Scintillometer Results (RS-120)

Hole ID

Azimuth

Dip

Total Depth
(m)

From (m)

To (m)

Width
(m)

CPS Range

BO-15-01

0

-70

412.50

117.35

<500 cps

BO-15-02

0

-70

426.00

126.00

202.00

205.00

3.00

<500 - 1350

BO-15-03

320

-70

301.00

108.00

<500 cps

BO-15-04

0

-70

324.00

120.40

<500 cps

BO-15-05

0

-70

300.00

87.80

<500 cps

BO-15-06

320

-70

423.00

116.00

<500 cps

BO-15-07

0

-70

258.00

108.30

<500 cps

BO-15-08

320

-70

285.00

119.00

<500 cps

BO-15-09

320

-70



<500 cps

BO-15-10

0

-70



206.50

207.50

1.00

<500 - 1400






210.00

211.50

1.50

<500 – 10200

 

Parameters:

  • Maximum internal dilution 2.00 m downhole
  • All depths and intervals are meters downhole
  • "Anomalous" means >500 cps (counts per second) total count gamma readings by gamma scintillometer type RS-120
  • "Off-scale" means >10,000 cps (counts per second) total count gamma readings by gamma scintillometer type RS-120
  • Where "Min cps" is <500 cps, this refers to local low radiometric zones within the overall radioactive interval

Natural gamma radiation in drill core reported in this news release was measured in counts per second (cps) using a Radiation Solutions Inc. RS-120 gamma-ray scintillometer. The reader is cautioned that total count gamma readings may not be directly or uniformly related to uranium grades of the rock sample measured; they should be used only as a preliminary indication of the presence of radioactive minerals. All intersections are downhole. Core interval measurements and true thicknesses are yet to be determined.

Split core samples will be taken systematically, and intervals will be submitted to SRC Geoanalytical Laboratories (an SCC ISO/IEC 17025: 2005 Accredited Facility) of Saskatoon for analysis.  All samples sent to SRC will be analyzed using ICP-MS for trace elements on the partial and total digestions, ICP-OES for major and minor elements on the total digestion, and fusion solution of boron by ICP-OES.  Mineralized samples are analyzed for U3O8 by ICP-OES and select samples for gold by fire assay.  Assay results will be released when received.

BOW DISCOVERY DRILLING

The Bow Discovery was found while testing a coincident VTEM conductor and a 5.4 pCi/L radon in water anomaly with drill hole BO-15-02, which intersected weak to moderate radioactivity (<500 to 1350 cps) over 3.0 m (202.0 to 205.0 m).  Drill hole BO-15-10 was a 66 m step out to the east of -02, and intersected 2.5 m total composite mineralization including 0.10 m off-scale radioactivity (>10,000 to 10,200 cps) within a 5.0 m section (206.5 to 211.5 m) associated with visible veinlets, flecks and blebs of pitchblende.  The radon anomalies at Bow are on trend 3.7 km to the northeast from the Arrow zone, and is situated at a major disruption and offset of the EM conductor with an associated gravity low anomaly that is transected by an inferred northwest cross cutting structure.

The Bow Discovery was historically drill tested by the Saskatchewan Mineral Development Corporation (a predecessor of Cameco) in 1980.  Drill programs in 1980 and 1982 completed a total of 12 shallow vertical drill holes (less than 155 m depth).  Several drill holes encountered significant alteration both immediately above and below the Athabasca Group and basement unconformity.  The most significant result was in drill hole PAT-04, which intersected 171 ppm uranium over 1.0 m at the unconformity. In most drill holes, anomalous pathfinder elements such as nickel, copper, lead, zinc, boron, and arsenic were also commonly present often immediately below the unconformity.

Interpretation thus far shows mineralization to be primarily focused within a moderately south dipping (~60°) package of E-W trending pelitic gneiss and mylonite (+/- pyrite, graphite and chlorite) with semipelitic hanging wall and footwall, which is underlain by an intrusive assemblage.  This conductive pelitic gneiss and mylonite package appears to be parallel along strike to the 090° oriented basement VTEM conductor for 420 m, which then flexures to the northeast and southwest at ~062° and ~225°, respectively.

In general, the Athabasca Group sandstones show local to extensive strong bleaching and clay alteration, and desilicification. Below the unconformity, basement lithologies comprise semipelitic gneiss, pelitic gneiss and mylonite (+/- graphite), quartzite, and an intrusive assemblage (granitic to granodioritic gneiss, mafic intrusive, and gabbro).  The garnet-bearing semipelitic rocks are interpreted to be similar to those observed immediately beneath the unconformity at the Arrow zone.  The VTEM conductor is marked by the presence of a variably wide strongly chloritized pelitic gneiss (+/- graphite) that is often sheared into a mylonite to ultramylonite.  An intensely smoky quartz unit (metamorphosed quartz vein or silicified semipelitic gneiss) is often adjacent or proximal to the pelitic gneiss and mylonite.  Hematite, chlorite, and clay all occur as relict feldspar and garnet.  Hematite and chlorite alteration is locally pervasive, especially directly below the unconformity.  Drusy quartz and dravite are also common alteration features at the Bow Discovery.

Structurally, the rocks at Bow are reported to show a high degree of brittle (in quartzofeldspathic rocks) and ductile (in pelitic rocks) deformation with features that include fracturing and potential fault controlled repetition of stratigraphy.  Mylonitization of the semipelitic hanging wall and footwall is evident adjacent and proximal to the conductive pelitic gneiss and mylonite package.  Further, the unconformity appears to have been offset, which could indicate the presence of a long-lived structurally controlled hydrothermal plumbing system, which is a key feature in a number of world-class mineralizing systems.

The Bow Discovery is situated within a broad circular gravity low with an approximate diameter of 800 m. The gravity low is flanked by a northeast-southwest offset VTEM conductor to the east and west. This VTEM conductor shows an apparent north-south dextral offset of up to 400 m, which is very similar to the geophysical signature seen at the Arrow zone.

BO-15-01:

Hole BO-15-01 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) to test coincident VTEM conductor and a strong 5.4 pCi/L radon anomaly located approximately 3.7 km northeast of the Arrow Zone.  The hole intersected strongly bleached and locally desilicified Athabasca Group sandstones from 67.5 m to the unconformity at 117.4 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 117.4 to 230.0 m, a pelitic gneiss and mylonite package from 230.0 to 240.0 m, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 240.0 to 271.3 m, and an intrusive assemblage below 271.3 m.

Intermittent fault zone was intersected from 210.0 to 270.0 m. Elevated radioactivity (300 to 480 cps with handheld RS-120 scintillometer) was intersected within the fault zone associated with graphite from 230.0 to 240.0 m. The interval of elevated radioactivity was underlain by approximately 10 m of intense, black coloured smoky quartz alteration.  The presence of dark smoky quartz may indicate that it was bombarded by radioactivity from uranium bearing hydrothermal fluids that traveled through this fault zone. This feature is regarded as an extremely important exploration indicator by the NexGen technical team as it is known to occur within and proximal to uranium deposits throughout the Athabasca Basin. A second zone of elevated radioactivity (200 to 300 cps with handheld RS-120) was intersected from 345.0 to 350.0 m. The hole was terminated at a depth of 412.5 m and represents the initiation of the Bow Discovery.

BO-15-02:

Hole BO-15-02 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) as a 30 m step out to the north of BO-15-01 to test up-dip from elevated radioactivity encountered in BO-15-01.

The hole intersected strongly bleached and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstones from 64.0 m to the unconformity at 120.0 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 120.0 to 202.2 m, a pelitic gneiss and mylonite package from 202.2 to 204.2 m, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 204.2 to 241.2 m, and an intrusive assemblage below 241.2 m.

The intermittent fault zone intersected in BO-15-01 intensifies structurally and contains stronger alteration up-dip in BO-15-02. A 3.0 m interval of mineralization from <500 to 1350 cps was intersected from 202.0 to 205.0 m, which corresponds to the up-dip intersection of elevated radioactivity from BO-15-01.  This anomalous radioactivity in BO-15-02 is within a graphitic mylonite stricken with foliation controlled quartz-carbonate-hematite stringers.  Smoky quartz was also observed proximal to the anomalous radioactivity, and dravite stringers and fracture coatings were observed from 162.0 to 192.0 m.  An interval of elevated radioactivity (200 to 420 cps with handheld RS-120) was intersected from approximately 320.0 to 335.0 m, which corresponds as the up-dip intersection of elevated radioactivity from drill hole BO-15-01.  The hole was terminated at a depth of 426.0 m.

BO-15-03:

Hole BO-15-03 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the northwest (320° azimuth) to test a flexure in the VTEM conductor along trend from BO-15-01 and -02.

The hole had no recovery until a depth of 122.0 m.  The Athabasca Group sandstones were picked from the down-hole gamma probe to start at 98.0 m to the unconformity at 108.0 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 108.0 to 161.0 m, a pelitic gneiss and mylonite package from 161.0 to 184.2 m, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 184.2 to 215.0 m, and an intrusive assemblage below 215.0 m.  Weak to strong hematite, chlorite, and clay alteration persisted throughout all of the units.  No anomalous radioactivity was encountered, and the hole was terminated at a depth of 301.0 m.  

BO-15-04:

Hole BO-15-04 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) to test up dip of the anomalous radioactivity intersected in BO-15-02.

The hole intersected variably bleached, hematized, and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 66.0 m to the unconformity at 120.4 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 120.4 to 161.4 m, a smoky quartz vein was encountered from 161.4 to 171.1 m in place of where the pelitic gneiss and mylonite package was projected up-dip, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 171.1 to 205.0 m, and an intrusive assemblage below 205.0 m.  Occasional irregular carbonate stringers were observed from 201.2 to 218.1 m, 249.1 to 260.1 m, and 263.9 to 274.3 m.  No anomalous radioactivity was encountered, and the hole was terminated at a depth of 324.0 m. 

BO-15-05:

Hole BO-15-05 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) to test a 35.9 pCi/L radon in lake water anomaly.

The hole intersected moderate to extreme bleached and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 80.9 m to the unconformity at 87.9 m.  Basement lithologies consisted largely of semipelitic gneiss intercalated with lesser intensely smoky quartzite, and pegmatite injections.  A smoky quartz vein with clay filled vugs from 87.9 to 93.1 m was underlain by moderate to extreme clay alteration from 93.1 to 144.5 m.  Weak to strong hematite, chlorite, and clay alteration persisted from 144.5 m to the end of the hole at 300.0 m.  Elevated radioactivity (200 to 400 cps with handheld RS-120) was intersected from 93.1 to 100.0 m.

BO-15-06:

Hole BO-15-06 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the northwest (320° azimuth) to test below and down-dip from historical drill hole PAT-04, which intersected 171 ppm uranium over 1.0 m at the unconformity.

The hole intersected strongly bleached and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 78.7 m to the unconformity at 116.0 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of intercalated semipelitic gneiss and smoky quartzite from 116.0 to 169.4 m.  A weakly graphitic package of pelitic to semipelitic gneiss was encountered from 169.4 to 174.9 m, which was underlain by intercalated smoky quartzite or quartz vein, semipelitic gneiss, and granitic gneiss to the end of hole depth of 423.0 m.  Moderate to strong clay and chlorite alteration was encountered from 116.0 to 169.4 m.  Weak to strong chlorite and clay alteration with lesser hematite persisted below 169.4 m.  Elevated radioactivity (200 to 300 cps with handheld RS-120) was encountered at the unconformity and along several fractures and unit contacts down the hole.

BO-15-07:

Hole BO-15-07 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) to test a 36.0 pCi/L radon in lake water anomaly.

The hole intersected an alternating strong to extreme bleached, desilicified, hematized, and silicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 76.0 m to the unconformity at 108.4 m.  Basement lithologies comprised entirely semipelitic gneiss with a silicified section from 138.3 to 161.9 m.  Moderate to extreme clay alteration was encountered from 108.4 to 138.3 m, weak hematite alteration from 138.3 to 161.9 m, and weak to strong chlorite alteration below 161.9 m.  No anomalous radioactivity was encountered, and the hole was terminated at a depth of 258.0 m.

BO-15-08:

Hole BO-15-08 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the northwest (320° azimuth) to test the VTEM conductor.

The hole intersected strongly to extremely bleached and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 72.0 m to the unconformity at 119.1 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 119.1 to 175.6 m, a pelitic gneiss and mylonite package from 175.6 to 192.5 m, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 192.5 to 251.0 m, and an intrusive assemblage below 251.0 m to the end of hole depth at 285.0 m.  Moderate to extreme clay and hematite alteration was encountered from 119.1 to 152.4 m.  Weak dravite alteration with rare dravite breccias (similar style to dravite breccia's found at the Arrow zone) were observed between 152.4 to 170.4 m.  Locally weak to strong chlorite, clay, and occasional irregular carbonate stringers below 170.4 m.  Elevated radioactivity (150 to 250 cps with handheld RS-120) was encountered at the unconformity and along several fractures and unit contacts down the hole.

BO-15-09:

Hole BO-15-09 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the northwest (320° azimuth) to test below and down-dip from historical drill hole PAT-13, which intersected 131 ppm uranium over 1.0 m in close proximity to the unconformity.

The hole intersected strongly to extremely bleached and desilicified Athabasca Group sandstone from 79.0 m to the unconformity at 112.0 m.  Basement lithologies consisted of silicified semipelitic and quartzite gneiss from 112.0 to 185.1 m, which is underlain by semipelitic gneiss to 395.0 m.  A strongly graphitic and pyritic mylonite and cataclastite was encountered from 395.0 to 409.7 m, which was underlain by semipelitic gneiss to the end of hole depth of 463.0 m.  Moderate to strong hematite alteration persists from 112.6 to 194.7 m where moderate dravite alteration as veinlets from 171.9 to 172.8 m exist.  Weak to strong chlorite alteration dominates, and includes wide intervals of clay and hematite from 194.7 to 463.0 m.  Sporadic elevated radioactivity (200 to 450 cps with handheld RS-120) was encountered within the Athabasca Sandstone above the unconformity at approximately 100.0 m, and continued along several fractures and unit contacts down the hole to 174.0 m.  Elevated radioactivity from approximately 200 cps to 350 cps was also observed from approximately 399.5 to 405.5 m, and was associated with the graphitic pyritic mylonite and cataclasite unit.

BO-15-10:

Hole BO-15-10 was drilled at an angled orientation (-70° dip) to the north (0° azimuth) as a 66 m step out to the east along strike from BO-15-02, which intersected anomalous radioactivity (<500 cps to 1350 cps) from 202.0 to 205.0 m.

The hole intersected moderate clay, chlorite, and hematite altered Athabasca Group sandstones from 71.5 m to the unconformity at 107.0 m. Basement lithologies consisted of a semipelitic gneiss hanging wall from 107.1 to 185.5 m, a strongly chloritized pelitic gneiss and mylonite package from 185.5 to 230.6 m, a footwall of semipelitic gneiss from 230.6 to 250.1 m, which is underlain by an intrusive assemblage to the end of hole depth of 359.7 m.  Strong clay and hematite alteration was encountered from 129.0 to 144.8 m, which overlaps with moderate to strong hematite alteration from 130.7 to 175.9 m.  Weak dravite alteration was observed from 146.8 to 189.4 m.  Moderate to strong chlorite and locally strong clay and hematite persisted from 175.9 to 359.7 m.  Drill hole BO-15-10 intersected 2.5 m total composite mineralization including 0.10 m off-scale radioactivity (>10,000 to 10,200 cps) within a 5.0 m section (206.5 to 211.5 m) associated with veinlets, flecks and blebs of pitchblende.  Sporadic elevated radioactivity (200 to 390 cps with handheld RS-120) was encountered along several fractures from 234.0 to 241.5 m.

REGIONAL DRILLING

RK-15-52:

Hole RK-15-52 was collared as a vertical (-90°) hole to test a strong 10.4 pCi/L radon-in-water anomaly in Patterson Lake located 400 m to the northeast along strike from the Arrow Zone.

The hole intersected bleached and locally strongly desilicified Athabasca Group sandstones between 53.8 m and the unconformity at 88.1 m.  Basement lithologies consisted largely of semipelitic gneiss and pelitic gneiss.  Elevated radioactivity associated with favourable alteration, which included dravite veinlets was intersected 4.0 m below the unconformity.  Locally strong hematite alteration persisted in the basement to the end of the hole at 235.0 m.

RK-15-53:

Hole RK-15-53 was collared at an angled orientation (318° azimuth, -70° dip) 155 m southeast of RK-15-52 and designed to test a VTEM conductor flanking a strong radon-in-water anomaly.

The hole intersected bleached, desilicified and locally intensely hematite altered Athabasca Group sandstones between 60.3 m and the unconformity at 92.0 m. Basement lithologies consisted largely of altered semipelitic gneiss.  Elevated radioactivity was encountered in association with mylonite and increased hydrothermal alteration at a depth of 228.0 m. The VTEM conductor was not explained in this drill hole, and it was terminated at 393.0 m.

RK-15-54:

Hole RK-15-54 was collared as an angled "scissor" hole (148° azimuth, -65° dip) to RK-15-53. It was designed to firstly test for high grade uranium mineralization at the unconformity directly below a strong radon-in-water anomaly in close proximity to prospective dravite alteration encountered in RK-15-52 and secondly, to test a VTEM conductor for basement style uranium mineralization similar to the Arrow Zone.

The hole intersected bleached Athabasca Group sandstones between 56.2 m and the unconformity at 98.6 m. Basement lithologies consisted largely of semipelitic gneiss, pegmatite injections and zones of hydrothermal breccia, mylonite and graphitic mylonite. The hole intersected four zones of elevated radioactivity in both the sandstone and basement, including one peak immediately below the unconformity.  The hole was terminated at 352.0 m after successfully intersecting the VTEM conductor at depth which consisted of favourable graphitic mylonite.

RK-15-56:

Hole RK-15-56 was collared 60 m northwest of RK-15-54 and drilled at an angled orientation (148° azimuth, -65° dip). It was designed to test the unconformity directly below a strong radon-in-water anomaly in close proximity to prospective dravite alteration encountered in RK-15-52 and RK-15-54.

The hole intersected bleached Athabasca Group sandstones between 69.5 m and the unconformity at 103.0 m. Basement lithlogies consisted largely of semipelitic gneiss. No anomalous radioactivity was intersected in the hole, but dravite alteration was again encountered; occurring only 3.0 m below the unconformity and in association with heavy white clay and hematite alteration. The hole was terminated at a depth of 288.0 m.

About NexGen

NexGen is a British Columbia corporation with a focus on the acquisition, exploration and development of Canadian uranium projects. NexGen has a highly experienced team of exploration professionals with a track record in the discovery of basement and unconformity-style uranium deposits in Canada.

NexGen owns a portfolio of highly prospective uranium exploration assets in the Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan, Canada, including a 100% interest in Rook I, location of the Arrow Discovery, immediately adjacent to the northeast of the Fission/Alpha Patterson Lake South Discovery, and an option to earn a 70% interest in the Radio Project, immediately adjacent to Rio Tinto's Roughrider Deposit.

The technical information in this news release has been prepared in accordance with the Canadian regulatory requirements set out in National Instrument 43-101 and reviewed on behalf of NexGen Energy Ltd., by Garrett Ainsworth, P.Geo., Vice President – Exploration & Development, a qualified person.

Leigh Curyer,
Chief Executive Officer
NexGen Energy Ltd.
+1 604 428 4112
lcuryer@nexgenenergy.ca
www.nexgenenergy.ca

The TSXV has neither approved nor disapproved the contents of this press release. Neither the TSXV nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSXV) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

Forward-Looking Information
This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities laws. Generally, but not always, forward looking information is identifiable by the use of words such as "will" and planned" and similar expressions. Forward-looking information is based on the then current expectations, beliefs, assumptions, estimates and forecasts about the Company's business and the industry and markets in which it operates.  Such information is not a guarantee of future performance and undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking information. Assumptions and factors underlying the Company's expectations regarding forward-looking information contained herein include, among others: that general business and economic conditions will not change in a material adverse manner; that financing will be available if and when needed on reasonable terms; that the Company's current exploration activities can be achieved and that its other corporate activities will proceed as expected; that third party contractors, equipment and supplies and governmental and other approvals required to conduct the Company's planned exploration activities will be available on reasonable terms and in a timely manner.

Although the assumptions made by the Company in providing forward looking information are considered reasonable by management at the time the forward-looking information is given, there can be no assurance that such assumptions will prove to be accurate. Forward-looking information also involves known and unknown risks and uncertainties and other factors, which may cause actual events or results in future periods to differ materially from any projections of future events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking information, including, among others: risks related to the availability of financing on commercially reasonable terms and the expected use of the proceeds; changes in the market; potential downturns in economic conditions; industry conditions; actual results of exploration activities being different than anticipated; changes in exploration programs based upon results of exploration; future prices of metal; availability of third party contractors; availability of equipment and supplies; failure of equipment to operate as anticipated; accidents, effects of weather and other natural phenomena and other risks associated with the mineral exploration industry; environmental risks; changes in laws and regulations; community relations; and delays in obtaining governmental or other approvals or financing. There can be no assurance that forward-looking information will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated, estimated or intended. NexGen undertakes no obligation to update or reissue forward-looking information as a result of new information or events except as required by applicable securities laws. The reader is cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking information.

SOURCE NexGen Energy Ltd.

Image with caption: "Figure 1: Bow Discovery Location (CNW Group/NexGen Energy Ltd.)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150331_C4011_PHOTO_EN_13748.jpg

Image with caption: "Figure 2: Northeast Patterson Lake Drill Holes and Radon Anomalies (CNW Group/NexGen Energy Ltd.)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150331_C4011_PHOTO_EN_13749.jpg

Image with caption: "Figure 3: Bow Discovery Drill Locations with Radon Anomalies (CNW Group/NexGen Energy Ltd.)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150331_C4011_PHOTO_EN_13750.jpg

Image with caption: "Figure 4: Drill Core Photo of BO-15-10 (203.5 to 218.5 m) (CNW Group/NexGen Energy Ltd.)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150331_C4011_PHOTO_EN_13751.jpg

Image with caption: "Figure 5: Drill Core Photo of BO-15-10 with Pitchblende Mineralization at 210.8 m (CNW Group/NexGen Energy Ltd.)". Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150331_C4011_PHOTO_EN_13752.jpg

For further information: Kin Communications, Tel: 604 684 6730, Toll free 1 866 684 6730, Email: nxe@kincommunications.com, Website: http://www.nexgenenergy.ca

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