New antibiotic now available to battle MRSA and other superbugs in Canadian hospitals



    TYGACIL(TM) HELPS REDUCE MORBIDITY, MORTALITY CAUSED BY SUPERBUGS

    MARKHAM, ON, March 7 /CNW/ - Wyeth Pharmaceuticals today announced that
Tygacil(TM)(tigecycline), a new intravenous (I.V.) antibiotic with a broad
spectrum of antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant bacteria, including
methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant
enterococci (VRE), is now available for sale to Canadian hospitals following
its recent approval by Health Canada. Tygacil, the first glycylcycline, is a
new antibiotic indicated for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal
infections (cIAI) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI)
in adults(1).
    "The increase in multiple drug-resistant pathogens in our hospitals and
communities needs to be at the forefront of concern in Canada," says
Dr. George Zhanel, Professor, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of
Medicine, at the University of Manitoba, and lead investigator in the CAN-ICU
study which examined the prevalence of these antibiotic-resistant bacteria in
Canadian intensive care units. "The availability of Tygacil comes at a time
when new and effective antibiotics are needed to assist us in combating rising
rates of resistant bugs in hospitals. Tygacil will be an important weapon in
our fight."
    The interim CAN-ICU study data, released in September, 2006 in Winnipeg,
indicated that the incidence of resistant bacteria was much higher than
previously believed. It revealed that among S. aureus bacteria, which is a
major cause of hospital-acquired wound and skin infections, on average one in
five (20 per cent) and as high as one-half (50 per cent) were resistant to the
antibiotic methicillin(2). This is higher than previous estimates, which
suggested MRSA had a prevalence of between 5 and 15 per cent(3). Researchers
also found a 6.7 per cent prevalence of VRE(4) and a 4.7 per cent prevalence
of antibiotic-resistant E. coli(5).

    Tygacil Exhibits Activity Against Potent Bacteria

    Effective against a wide variety of bacteria, Tygacil can be used
empirically (before specific bacteria have been identified) at the onset of
treatment. Tygacil can be used alone to treat a variety of cIAI and cSSSI
infections, including complicated appendicitis, infected burns,
intra-abdominal abscesses, deep soft tissue infections, and infected ulcers.
In addition, Tygacil does not require dosage adjustment in patients with
impaired renal function, and is conveniently dosed every 12 hours(6).
    The economic impact of patients who suffer from infections due to
resistant pathogens is far reaching. It is estimated that the annual cost of
MRSA and managing infected patients is $42 million to $59 million for all
Canadian hospitals(7).
    The increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria often necessitates the
use of combinations of antibiotics to fight infections. About 70 per cent of
hospital-acquired infections are resistant to at least one drug(9). According
to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, antibiotic resistance
has become so widespread that many significant bacterial infections in the
world are becoming resistant to commonly used antibiotics(10). New classes of
antibiotics are needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance among
common pathogens(11).

    About Tygacil

    Tygacil, the first glycylcycline, was developed by Wyeth to overcome two
key mechanisms of resistance that have limited the use of a number of
antibiotics. It is now commercially available for sale in Canada to hospital
pharmacists, who can order the product directly from Wyeth.
    In clinical trials, treatment with Tygacil alone provided comparable
clinical cures rates in cSSSI to vancomycin in combination with aztreonam.
Treatment with Tygacil also provided clinical cure rates comparable to
imipenem/cilastatin, a treatment for cIAI. The overall discontinuation rate
for Tygacil (4.9 per cent) was comparable to vancomycin and aztreonam (5.3 per
cent) and imipenem/cilastatin (4.4 per cent).

    About Wyeth

    Wyeth (NYSE:  WYE) is one of the world's largest research-driven
pharmaceutical and health care products companies. It is a leader in the
discovery, development, manufacturing and marketing of pharmaceuticals,
vaccines, biotechnology products and non-prescription medicines that improve
the quality of life for people worldwide.
    Wyeth Canada, an affiliate of Wyeth, employs over 1,700 people across the
country with a commercial head office in Markham, Ontario and manufacturing
and R&D facilities in Montreal, Quebec. It markets leading products in the
areas of women's health care, neuroscience, musculoskeletal therapy,
transplantation and immunology, hemophilia and vaccines.

    
    ----------------------------------------
    (1)  Tygacil Canadian Product Monograph
    (2)  M. Decorby, N. Laing, B. Weshnoweski, M. Edel, K. Karlowsky,
         JA. Karlowsky, R. Vashisht, C. Siemens, M. Mccracken, M. Mulvey,
         DJ. Hoban, GG. Zhanel; Antimicrobial Resistance in Pathogens
         Isolated From Canadian Intensive Care Units: Results of the Canadian
         National Intensive Care Unit (CAN-ICU) Study 2005.
    (3)  Simor AE, Ofner-Agostini M, Bryce, et al. The evolution of
         methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Canadian hospitals:
         5 years of national surveillance. CMAJ 2001;165:21-5
    (4)  M. Decorby, N. Laing, B. Weshnoweski, M. Edel, K. Karlowsky,
         JA. Karlowsky, R. Vashisht, C. Siemens, M. Mccracken, M. Mulvey,
         DJ. Hoban, GG. Zhanel; Antimicrobial Resistance in Pathogens
         Isolated From Canadian Intensive Care Units: Results of the Canadian
         National Intensive Care Unit (CAN-ICU) Study 2005.
    (5)  M. Decorby, N. Laing, B. Weshnoweski, M. Edel, K. Karlowsky,
         JA. Karlowsky, R. Vashisht, C. Siemens, M. Mccracken, M. Mulvey,
         DJ. Hoban, GG. Zhanel; Antimicrobial Resistance in Pathogens
         Isolated From Canadian Intensive Care Units: Results of the Canadian
         National Intensive Care Unit (CAN-ICU) Study 2005.
    (6)  Tygacil Canadian Product Monograph
    (7)  Kim T. Infection Control Hospital Epidemiology 2001;22:99
    (8)  Conly J. CMAJ 2002;167:885
    (9)  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prevent
         Antimicrobial Resistance in Healthcare Settings. Available at:
         http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/healthcare/problem.htm. Accessed
         April 8, 2005.
    (10) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). General
         Information about Antibiotic Resistance. Available at:
         http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/community/faqs.htm. Accessed
         April 8, 2005.
    (11) Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, et al. Trends in antimicrobial
         drug development: implications for the future. Clin Infect Dis.
         2004;38:1279-1286.
    (12) Tygacil Canadian Product Monograph
    (13) Tygacil Canadian Product Monograph
    





For further information:

For further information: Joanne Koskie or Ethan Pigott, Cohn & Wolfe,
(416) 924-5700 ext. 4049 or 4059, joanne_koskie@ca.cohnwolfe.com,
ethan_pigott@ca.cohnwolfe.com; Della Rollins, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, (905)
470-3945, rollinde@wyeth.com

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