More Teenagers and Young Adults with Cancer Surviving



    
    More Research and Support Needed to Meet Needs of Young Patients

    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 released by Canadian Cancer Society
    

    TORONTO, April 16 /CNW/ - As more young people with cancer survive, there
is increasing need to do more to meet the distinct challenges of these young
patients, according to Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 released today by the
Canadian Cancer Society.
    The special focus of this year's report is cancer in adolescents and
young people 15 to 29 years of age.
    "Cancer is a devastating disease for anyone, but it can be especially
difficult for a young person," says Heather Logan, Senior Director, Cancer
Control Policy and Information, Canadian Cancer Society. "These young people
are in high school or university, building a career or raising a family.
Cancer is not something they were expecting to deal with at this stage of
their lives."
    There are approximately 2,075 young people in Canada between 15 and 29
years of age diagnosed each year with cancer and about 326 deaths per year in
this age group. The five-year survival for this age group is 85 per cent - a
five per cent increase from 1992-1995.
    "The relatively small number of young people with cancer does not
accurately convey the huge impact this disease has on the patients, their
families and society," says Loraine Marrett, Chair of the Statistics Steering
Committee and an epidemiologist with Cancer Care Ontario. "The last thing a
young person expects to be faced with is a devastating disease that could
affect them both physically and emotionally for many years."
    "While the increase in survival is good news, more information is needed
about cancer in this age group and about the unique challenges these young
patients face so more can be done," says Logan.

    Unique challenges

    
    Psychosocial challenges for young people with cancer include:

    -   coping with changes to their bodies due to side effects of treatment,
        such as hair loss, acne, weight gain, reduced sexuality or fertility
    -   feeling isolated and unable to find peers for emotional support
    -   being overwhelmed by trying to navigate through a cancer system that
        is not tailored to young people

    Other issues include:

    -   delays in diagnosis because:
        -   young people often feel invincible and don't seek medical help
            promptly
        -   healthcare professionals may be less familiar with cancer
            symptoms in young people and may not think about cancer as a
            diagnosis.

    -   responding differently to treatment compared to other age groups

    -   lower participation of young people in clinical trials, which results
        in slower gains in survival (about 10-20 per cent of older teenagers
        with cancer take part in clinical trials compared to 80 per cent of
        children)

    -   protocols for the treatment of childhood cancers differ from
        treatment for adults, and teenagers and young adults fall in-between

    -   limited opportunity for prevention as currently there is limited
        information about risk factors for cancers that are common in young
        people

    -   the possibility of future health problems (called late effects) as a
        result of either the cancer or the treatment
    

    Shawn's story

    Shawn Sajkowski was 25 and starting his career in a new city when he
discovered a lump in his thigh in June 2000. The diagnosis: non-Hodgkin
lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system.
    "It totally blindsided me," Sajkowski says. "It's the last thing you
expect when you're 25."
    Working in Brockville, Ontario, Sajkowski decided to move back to his
hometown of Kitchener, Ontario, where he was able to find another job. He
underwent five months of chemotherapy treatment. But successive relapses led
to an arduous stem cell transplant in 2006 (his brother was the donor). His
immune system had to first be wiped out and then rebuilt for three months
after the procedure before he could leave hospital. All told, the disease
sidelined Sajkowski from work for 20 months. He also lost a long-term
relationship.
    "I felt cheated," he says. "I watched friends getting married, going on
trips, advancing in their careers - and I was in a stalemate."
    Now in remission, Sajkowski works for technology powerhouse Research in
Motion, practices meditation and loves volunteering with the Canadian Cancer
Society's peer support service, CancerConnection.
    "I've gone through the highs and lows," the 34-year-old says. "It's
important to have that experience and knowledge available to anyone who needs
it."

    Implications and recommendations

    To better meet the needs of young people with cancer, recommendations
include:

    
    -   improving awareness of cancer among young people and healthcare
        providers

    -   finding innovative ways to increase and improve communication between
        doctors and their young patients, early diagnosis, treatment and
        medical follow-up

    -   strengthening advocacy and support services

    -   improving research into, and surveillance of, risk factors for
        cancers that are common in young people and identifying trends in
        these cancers to help identify priorities and predict future burden
        on health resources

    -   improving funding for research, as well as for programs and services
        for young people with cancer

    -   developing clinical practice guidelines for all phases of cancer care
        for this age group, including long-term follow-up
    

    These recommendations build on a major 2006 Canadian report about cancer
in young adults (ages 20-44), as well as reports from the US National Cancer
Institute and from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program.
    "The Canadian Cancer Society supports these recommendations," says Paul
Lapierre, Vice President, Public Affairs and Cancer Control, Canadian Cancer
Society. "Each and every young person with cancer deserves the best of care
with strong support."

    
    Highlights: Cancer in adolescents and young people (15 to 29 years of
    age)

    -   The overall cancer incidence rate has risen since 1996. The death
        rate has declined since 1992.

    -   Lymphomas are one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer in
        both sexes, along with thyroid cancer in females and testicular
        cancer in males.

    -   Leukemia accounts for the most cancer deaths in each sex.

    Highlights: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009

    -   An estimated 171,000 new cases of cancer (excluding 75,100 non-
        melanoma skin cancers), and 75,300 deaths from cancer are expected to
        occur in Canada in 2009.

    -   The five-year relative survival rate for all cancers combined is 62
        per cent (excluding Quebec) - an improvement of 4.5 per cent since
        1992-1994.(*)

    -   At the beginning of 2005, there were 695,000 people (or about one in
        46 Canadians) living with a cancer that had been diagnosed sometime
        in the previous 10 years.

    -   About 40 per cent of Canadian women and 45 per cent of men will
        develop cancer during their lifetimes.

    -   About 24 per cent of women and 29 per cent of men, or approximately
        one out of four Canadians, is expected to die from cancer.
    

    "Preventing cancer and supporting individuals, families and communities
in dealing with its impacts, are public health priorities," says Dr. David
Butler-Jones, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer. "We all have a role to
play, working in collaboration, to make a difference in the lives of
Canadians."
    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 is prepared, printed and distributed
through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health
Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries,
as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based
cancer researchers.

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of
volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of
the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more
about cancer, visit our website at www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free,
bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

    
    -   For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009, visit the
        Society's website at www.cancer.ca

    -   A webcast of the media conference is available at:
        http://hosting.epresence.tv/munk/ (click on "live webcast schedule").
        The conference will be archived at the same link (click on "archived
        webcast events.")

    (*) Five-year relative survival is the ratio of the proportion of people
alive five years after their diagnosis and the proportion of similar people in
the general population expected to be alive in five years.

    When adjusted for differences in age distribution of the population, a
    4.5 per cent increase in survival has occurred from 1992-1994 to 2002-
    2004.
    Survival data from Quebec have been excluded, in part, because the method
    of ascertaining the date of cancer diagnosis differs from the method used
    by other registries.
    


    Media backgrounder No.1: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009

    
    Cancer in Teenagers and Young Adults (15-29 years of age): Fast Facts
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    New cases and deaths

    -   There are approximately 2,075 new cancer cases per year and about 326
        deaths per year in this age group.

    Survival

    -   The five-year survival for this age group is 85 per cent - a five per
        cent increase from 1992 and 1995.

    Incidence and death rates

    -   Incidence rates increased in both sexes during 1996-2005: males by
        0.8 per cent per year and females by 1.4 per cent per year.

    -   Death rates declined in both sexes during 1995-2004: males by 2.9 per
        cent per year and females by 1.4 per cent per year.

    Most common

    -   The most common cancers for young males are testicular cancer and
        lymphoma.

    -   The most common cancers for young females are thyroid cancer and
        lymphoma.

    -   The most common cause of cancer death is leukemia in both males and
        females.

    Lymphoma is a type of cancer that develops in the lymphatic system. There
are two types of lymphomas - Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Prevention

    -   Little is known about what causes cancer in young people, which
        currently limits opportunities for prevention.

    -   One important opportunity for prevention in this age group is
        cervical cancer. For the most part, this cancer can be avoided or
        more easily treated if detected early. The Pap test is effective in
        early detection of cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine is expected to
        further reduce future incidence and death from this type of cancer.

    -   For young men, it is important to be aware of any changes in their
        testicles and report these to their healthcare provider.

    -   Certain congenital anomalies (for example, undescended testicle) or a
        family history of cancer appears to increase risk for certain cancers
        (testicular, breast and colorectal cancers) in young people.

    -   Growing evidence shows that the use of tanning beds and sunlamps may
        increase skin cancer risk, especially if exposure begins in
        adolescence or young adulthood. This includes malignant melanoma (the
        most serious form of skin cancer).

    -   Most cancers in young people are less likely to be associated with
        environmental carcinogens because people in this age group have not
        had enough time to accrue the mutations that lead to cancer.

    -   The lifestyles of teenagers and young adults may affect their cancer
        risk both now and in later years. Cancer prevention for this age
        group should start as soon as possible, focusing on:

        -   getting screened for cervical cancer
        -   considering the HPV vaccine
        -   practising SunSense, avoiding overexposure to the sun and tanning
            beds;
        -   not smoking, or quitting
        -   reducing alcohol intake or drinking only in moderation
        -   eating a healthy diet, being active, and maintaining a healthy
            body weight
        -   not engaging in risky sexual activity.

    Screening

    -   Screening for tumours in this age group (except for cervical cancer)
        has not proven effective. This is partly due to the rarity of cancers
        and their short latency period (amount of time from exposure to onset
        of cancer).

    Treatment

    -   Because of a lack of cancer treatment programs or centres
        specifically targeted to young people, patients in this age group may
        not always receive the most age-appropriate care. In adult centres,
        for example, young people may receive less aggressive treatments even
        though they may be physiologically capable of tolerating more
        intensive therapies. However, young people are less likely than older
        adults to have other conditions that could interfere with their
        treatment.

    -   Pediatric and adult oncologists may be less familiar with treatment
        and supportive care for teenagers and young people with cancer as
        they typically do not treat the cancers that are the most common in
        this age group.

    -   Compared to children, teenagers and young adults are less likely to
        be enrolled in clinical trials or receive treatments based on
        clinical trial protocols, which are associated with better health
        outcomes.
    

    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 is prepared, printed and distributed
through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health
Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries,
as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based
cancer researchers.

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of
volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of
the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more
about cancer, visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free, bilingual
Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

    
    -   For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009, visit the
        Society's website at www.cancer.ca

    -   A webcast of the media conference is available at:
        http://hosting.epresence.tv/munk/ (click on "live webcast schedule").
        The conference will be archived at the same link (click on "archived
        webcast events.")
    


    Media backgrounder No.2: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009

    
    Cancer in Canada: Fast Facts
    ----------------------------
    

    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 was released today by the Canadian Cancer
Society.
    In general, the incidence and death rates for the majority of cancer
types have stabilized or declined during the past decade. This means that a
person's risk of cancer has remained stable.

    Survival

    For the first time, this publication includes survival estimates
comparing the change in survival over a ten-year period (1992-1994 to
2002-2004).

    
    -   For people diagnosed in 2002-2004, the five-year relative survival
        for all cancers combined in Canada (excluding Quebec) was 62 per
        cent. This is a 4.5 per cent increase from those diagnosed in 1992-
        1994.(*)

    -   The improvement in survival was greatest for non-Hodgkin lymphoma;
        prostate, colorectal and breast cancers; and leukemia.

    -   Survival is highest for thyroid, testicular and prostate cancers and
        melanoma.

    -   Survival is lowest for pancreatic, esophageal, lung and liver
        cancers.

    Current new cases and deaths

    -   In 2009:

        -   There will be an estimated 171,000 new cases of cancer - an
            increase of 4,600 from last year.

        -   There will be an estimated 75,300 deaths from cancer - an
            increase of 1,500 from last year.
    

    The number of new cancer cases and deaths continues to rise steadily as
the Canadian population grows and ages.

    Prevalence

    At the beginning of 2005, there were 695,000 people (or about one in 46
Canadians) living with a cancer that had been diagnosed sometime in the
previous 10 years.

    
    Males

    -   Overall death rate: Since 1988, the cancer death rate for Canadian
        males has been declining as a result of decreases for prostate, lung
        and several other cancers.

    -   Overall incidence rate: The cancer incidence rate for males rose
        slightly in the early 1990s, and then declined sharply until 2001
        when it rose slightly again (following the overall trend in prostate
        cancer). The rate has since stabilized.

    For males, the following statistically significant changes (two per cent
or more per year) were observed:

    -   Incidence rates (1996-2005):

        -   decreases in stomach and larynx cancers

        -   increases in thyroid and liver cancers

    -   Death rates (1995-2004):

        -   decreases in Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach, larynx, prostate, oral
            and lung cancers

        -   increase in liver cancer

    Females

    -   Overall death rate: The cancer death rate for Canadian females has
        remained relatively stable since 1980. If lung cancer is excluded, a
        major decline of 20 per cent has occurred for other types of cancer
        over a 30-year period.

    -   Overall incidence rate: The cancer incidence rate for Canadian
        females has been increasing slowly and steadily, but now appears to
        be leveling off.

    For females, the following statistically significant changes (two per cent
or more per year) were observed:

    -   Incidence rates (1996-2005):

        -   decreases in larynx and cervical cancers

        -   increase in thyroid cancer

    -   Death rates (1995-2004):

        -   decreases in Hodgkin lymphoma, cervical and stomach cancers

    Prostate cancer

    -   Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among
        Canadian men.

    -   Two peaks in prostate cancer incidence occurred in 1993 and 2001,
        each followed by a decline. These peaks mirror two waves of
        intensified screening for prostate cancer with the PSA (prostate
        specific antigen) test.

    -   The prostate cancer death rate declined significantly between 1995
        and 2004.

    Breast cancer

    -   Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Canadian
        women.

    -   The breast cancer incidence rate has declined since 1999.

    -   The breast cancer death rate has declined by more than 30 per cent
        since 1986. This is likely because of increased screening by
        mammography and improved treatment.

    Lung cancer

    -   In females, lung cancer incidence and death rates have been
        increasing since 1980, but the incidence rate is now stabilizing.

    -   Among males, rising lung cancer incidence and death rates began to
        level off in the mid-1980s and have been declining ever since.

    -   Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death for both males
        and females.

    The differences between male and female trends reflect the drop in tobacco
consumption that began for males in the mid 1960s and much later - in the
mid-1980s - for females.

    Colorectal cancer

    -   Although the long-term trend in the incidence rates in both sexes is
        complex, recently rates appear to be stable or declining.

    -   Death rates continue to decline significantly for both men and women.
    

    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 is prepared, printed and distributed
through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health
Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries,
as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based
cancer researchers.

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of
volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of
the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more
about cancer, visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free, bilingual
Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

    (*) Five-year relative survival is the ratio of the proportion of people
alive five years after their diagnosis and the proportion of similar people in
the general population expected to be alive in five years.

    
    When adjusted for differences in age distribution of the population, a
    4.5 per cent increase in survival has occurred from 1992-1994 to 2002-
    2004.

    Survival data from Quebec have been excluded, in part, because the method
    of ascertaining the date of cancer diagnosis differs from the method used
    by other registries.

    -   For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009, visit the
        Society's website at www.cancer.ca

    -   A webcast of the media conference is available at:
        http://hosting.epresence.tv/munk/ (click on "live webcast schedule").
        The conference will be archived at the same link (click on "archived
        webcast events.")
    


    Media backgrounder No.3: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009

    
    Preventing Cancer in Young Adults
    ---------------------------------
    

    The Canadian Cancer Society urges young people to become informed and
take action against cancer.
    "It's never too early to start learning how to protect yourself from
cancer," says Heather Logan, Senior Director, Cancer Control Policy and
Information, Canadian Cancer Society. "We urge teenagers and young adults to
find out what they can do to help prevent cancer now."
    Because cancer can take many years to develop, prevention is important in
the younger years as it may help reduce the risk of getting cancer in later
years.
    "We encourage teenagers, young adults and parents of young children to
gain the knowledge and practices today that could reduce the risk of
developing cancer in the future," says Logan.

    Be aware of your body

    Young people should know what is normal for their body and report any
changes to a healthcare provider.

    
    -   For young women: know what is normal for your breasts, look for
        changes in your skin and report any other changes to your overall
        health.

    -   For young men: know what is normal for your testicles, look for
        changes to your skin and report any other changes to your overall
        health.

    Key areas

    Key actions to reduce cancer in the younger population are:

    -   reducing exposure to ultraviolet rays from both sunlight and tanning
        beds
    -   for females, getting screened for cervical cancer and considering
        getting the HPV vaccine
    -   for males, learning about testicular cancer
    

    Reducing exposure to sunlight

    The Society recommends Canadians protect themselves from overexposure to
the sun particularly between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun's rays are at
their strongest or any time of the day when the UV index is three or more.
    Skin cancer incidence rates continue to rise in Canada, including among
young adults. A recent survey, funded by the Canadian Cancer Society, shows
that young people (16-24 years of age) are:

    
    -   spending the most time in the sun and are least likely to protect
        themselves from overexposure to the sun
    -   are the most likely to try to get a tan - either from the sun or by
        using tanning equipment.
    

    Cervical cancer

    Pap test
    If a young woman is sexually active, she should have a Pap test every one
to three years, or according to the screening guidelines in her province.

    HPV vaccine
    The HPV vaccine has been approved for females aged 9-26 years of age. It
protects against the HPV viruses that cause more than 70 per cent of cervical
cancer cases and most types of genital warts. The vaccine should be used along
with cervical cancer screening, not instead of screening.
    The Society urges parents and young women to talk to their healthcare
professionals to decide what is best for them.
    The primary risk factor for developing cervical cancer is infection of
the cervix with HPV. More than 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual
intercourse, genital skin-to-skin contact and oral sex. These types can infect
the genital areas of both men and women.
    It is estimated that about 75 per cent of sexually active men and women
in Canada will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime.

    Testicular cancer

    All men, from the time they are 15 years old, should be aware of how
their testicles normally look and feel. Knowing what is normal and reporting
any changes to a doctor may help find cancer earlier. Early detection of
testicular cancer can make a difference in the treatment of the disease.

    Starting healthy habits now

    Other ways young people can help prevent cancer both now and in later 
years, include:

    
    Don't smoke or quit if you do

    The best thing young people can do for their health - both now and for
    the future - is to not smoke, or quit.

    Smoking causes about 85 per cent of lung cancer case in Canada and is
    responsible for 30 per cent of all cancer deaths.

    Smoker's Helpline is a free, confidential telephone support service for
    smokers trying to quit and the people who support them. Call the
    Society's Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333 to find out more.

    Eat well, be active, maintain a healthy weight

    Eating well and being active at a young age helps develop healthy habits
    in later years.

    Eating well begins with eating a variety of foods each day to get the
    nutrients needed for good health. Eat more fibre and less fat, salt and
    sugar. Making healthy food choices, along with being active, will help
    maintain a healthy weight. Governments can also implement policies that
    help makes these healthy choices easy choices for everyone.

    Research shows that about 30 to 35 per cent of all cancers can be
    prevented by eating well, being active and maintaining a healthy body
    weight.

    Drinking alcohol can increase the risk of developing several types of
    cancer. If you drink alcohol, limit the amount you drink:

        -   females: less than one drink a day (pregnant women should avoid
            alcohol)
        -   males: less than two drinks a day
    

    Where to find more information

    To find out more, call the Society's Cancer Information Service at 1 888
939-3333 or visit www.cancer.ca.
    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 is prepared, printed and distributed
through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health
Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries,
as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based
cancer researchers.

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of
volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of
the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more
about cancer, visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free, bilingual
Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

    
    -   For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009, visit the
        Society's website at www.cancer.ca

    -   A webcast of the media conference is available at:
        http://hosting.epresence.tv/munk/ (click on "live webcast schedule").
        The conference will be archived at the same link (click on "archived
        webcast events.")
    


    Media backgrounder No.4: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009

    
    Cancer in Teenagers and Young Adults and the Canadian Cancer Society
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    

    The Canadian Cancer Society works across Canada to ensure that no one is
alone in the fight against cancer. The Society funds research about cancer in
young people and provides information, support and services.

    Research

    The Canadian Cancer Society has committed more than $9.7 million since
1998 to fund research about cancer in young people, including teenagers and
children. Projects include:

    
    -   developing an innovative web-based approach to promote cervical
        health in young women

    -   assessing the ongoing health risks, educational issues and long-term
        support needs of children and young people diagnosed before the age
        of 25

    -   developing better ways to diagnose and treat a type of cancer -
        synovial sarcoma - that typically affects young adults. This type of
        cancer arises in the muscles, bones, joints nerves and other
        connective tissues in the body
    

    Support

    You don't have to go through it alone: The Society encourages young
people with cancer (18 years of age or older) to call the Society's
CancerConnection program.
    Specially-trained volunteers provide a listening ear and valuable
suggestions for people with cancer, and for people who care about them.
Callers will be matched with someone who has been through a similar experience
and who the caller feels comfortable talking with. This telephone-based
program is free and confidential.
    Call 1 888 939-3333 to get connected to this service.

    Camps: In some provinces, the Canadian Cancer Society runs, or provides
financial support for, camps for children and teenagers with cancer. Camps
take place in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

    Transportation services: For people (18 years of age or older) who
qualify, some Canadian Cancer Society provincial divisions provide
transportation services to and from treatment centres. In some cases, younger
people can use the service if accompanied by a guardian.

    Financial services: For people (18 years of age or older) who qualify,
some Society provincial divisions provide financial services to help cover the
costs of such things as accommodation during treatment, meals and
transportation costs.

    Accommodation: For people who qualify, some Society provincial divisions
provide accommodation for out-of-town patients.

    Services offered by the Canadian Cancer Society vary from province to
province.

    Information

    Information about all aspects of cancer is available by:

    
    -   visiting the Canadian Cancer Society's website - www.cancer.ca
    -   calling the Society's Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333
    

    Advocacy

    Caregiver support: The Society is advocating for increased financial
support for caregivers - people who care for loved ones who have cancer or
other serious illnesses. The Society is recommending that caregivers receive
financial support for 26 weeks, instead of the current six weeks.

    Banning smoking in cars: Across Canada, the Canadian Cancer Society
advocates for a ban on smoking in vehicles with teenagers and children.
Protecting infants and young people from second-hand smoke is critical as they
are more severely affected by exposure.

    Tell us your story

    We invite young people with cancer to visit the Society's Stories of Hope
website (www.cancer.ca/stories). Read about other people's experiences with
cancer and share yours. These stories are a source of hope and inspiration for
anyone facing cancer.

    Find out more

    To find out more about the Society's services, including those for young
people with cancer, call the Society's Cancer Information Service at 1 888
939-3333 or visit www.cancer.ca.
    Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009 is prepared, printed and distributed
through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health
Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries,
as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based
cancer researchers.

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of
volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of
the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more
about cancer, visit our website at www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free,
bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

    
    -   For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2009, visit the
        Society's website at www.cancer.ca

    -   A webcast of the media conference is available at:
        http://hosting.epresence.tv/munk/ (click on "live webcast schedule").
        The conference will be archived at the same link (click on "archived
        webcast events.")


    /NOTE TO PHOTO EDITORS: A photo accompanying this release is available on
    the CNW Photo Network and archived at http://photos.newswire.ca.
    Additional archived images are also available on the CNW Photo Archive
    website at http://photos.newswire.ca. Images are free to accredited
    members of the media/
    





For further information:

For further information: Karen Ramlall, Communications Manager, (416)
934-5655; French media contact: Alexa Giorgi, Bilingual Communications
Specialist, (416) 934-5681


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