Media advisory - Nova Scotia Poised to Become First Province to Adopt Province-Wide Legislation Banning Smoking in Vehicles with Children under 19



    Canadian Cancer Society Supports Legislation

    HALIFAX, Dec. 12 /CNW/ - The Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly will be
voting on Thursday, December 13 to decide whether the province will adopt
nationally precedent-setting legislation banning smoking in vehicles with kids
under age 19. If the legislation is passed, Nova Scotia will become the first
province in Canada to extend such protection to children and youth.
    The Canadian Cancer Society supports the Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly
in considering this progressive legislation that would help protect children
and youth from the harmful effects of second-hand smoke. This proposed
legislation closely follows a similar first-time bylaw passed by Wolfville,
Nova Scotia in November 2007.

    
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    What:                                Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly
                                         voting on Bill 6, which would ban
                                         smoking in vehicles with kids under
                                         19.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Where:                               Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly
                                         Chamber, Province House, 1726 Hollis
                                         Street, Halifax
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    When:                                Vote to take place Thursday,
                                         December 13,
                                         (approximately 1:45 p.m.)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Canadian Cancer Society              Maureen Summers, Executive Director,
     spokespeople                        Canadian Cancer Society, Nova Scotia
                                         Division.

                                         Rob Cunningham, Senior
                                         Policy Analyst, Canadian Cancer
                                         Society, Ottawa.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Background:                          Protecting children from second-hand
                                         smoke is critical as infants and
                                         children are more severely affected
                                         by the exposure to second-hand smoke
                                         than adults because they are
                                         smaller, have immature immune
                                         systems, and higher respiratory
                                         rates.

                                         The level of second-hand smoke in
                                         vehicles can be far higher than
                                         those found in smoky bars. Research
                                         shows that childhood exposure to
                                         second-hand smoke is linked to
                                         sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS),
                                         ear infections, asthma, and
                                         respiratory disease. Research also
                                         suggests a link between exposure to
                                         second-hand smoke and childhood
                                         leukemias, lymphomas, and brain
                                         tumours.

                                         Laws banning smoking in cars with
                                         children have been passed in
                                         California, Arkansas, Louisiana,
                                         Puerto Rico, Bangor (Maine), Keyport
                                         (New Jersey), Rockland County (New
                                         York), and the Australian states of
                                         South Australia and Tasmania. A
                                         number of other U.S. states are in
                                         the process of enacting this type of
                                         legislation.

                                         In Canada, private members bills
                                         have recently been introduced in the
                                         B.C. and Ontario legislatures.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    

    The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization
whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality
of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more about cancer,
visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free Cancer Information
Service at 1 888 939-3333.





For further information:

For further information: Meg McCallum, Director of Programs and District
Services, Canadian Cancer Society, Nova Scotia Division, (902) 423-6183, ext
227; Rob Cunningham, Senior Policy Analyst, National office, Ottawa, (613)
565-2522, ext. 305

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