Lotto questions no.4 - (still more questions worth asking)



    HALIFAX, Nov. 12 /CNW/ - On the eve of Atlantic Lotto's November 14
appearance before Nova Scotia's Standing Committee on Public Accounts, we
decided to check what was said the last time.
    We refer to the Hansard transcript of the January 25, 2006, Committee
meeting: www.gov.ns.ca/legislature/hansard/comm/pa/pa_2006jan25.htm

    
    Atlantic Lotto's president, Michelle Carinci, told the Committee that:

      We follow, first of all, the Atlantic Procurement Agreement, and the
      principles of that. Any contract that has the potential to be over the
      amount of $50,000 goes to a formal request for proposal and then goes
      through a very, very rigorous process that includes the parties that
      are interested in that contract within the corporation, Internal Audit,
      in some special occasions we might also include external audit in that
      process, as well as our purchasing department. So that's the rigour
      that's put behind that process.

    Vice President Brian Daigle had the following exchange with Keith Colwell
    (MLA, Preston):

      MR. PATRICK DAIGLE: I would love to talk a little bit about our supply
      chain management process because I'm very proud of it, and, to
      Michelle's point, it's a very rigorous process. Every contract for
      service that is in excess of $50,000 is publicly tendered, and that's
      in accordance with the Atlantic Procurement Agreement. We do adhere to
      that agreement. So we would advertise either in the newspaper or on the
      provincial Opportunities electronic bulletin boards. So virtually every
      opportunity above $50,000 from a services perspective.

      MR. COLWELL: How do you handle contracts below $50,000?

      MR. DAIGLE: We delineate between goods and services. Goods that are
      less than $5,000, we require one quote; goods that are greater than
      $5,000, we require three quotes; goods that are greater than $25,000,
      we publicly advertise, either through a request for a quotation or a
      request for proposals. Those guidelines are in accordance with the
      Atlantic Procurement Agreement. From a services perspective, any
      services under that threshold of $50,000, we seek one quote; above
      $50,000 we go a public tendering process.

    Earlier this year, Atlantic Lotto gave a foreign company a significant
contract for iBingo, without public disclosure or open, competitive tendering.
Atlantic Lotto has defended its conduct as consistent with Atlantic Lotto
policy.

    Which leads us to ask:

    1. Any reason why single-source contracts weren't mentioned to the Public
       Accounts Committee?

    2. How does single-sourcing square with the following statements to the
       Public Accounts Committee?  "Any contract that has the potential to be
       over the amount of $50,000 goes to a formal request for proposal ..."
       & "Every contract for service that is in excess of $50,000 is publicly
       tendered ..."

    3. While we're at it, how does Atlantic Lotto's handling of the iBingo
       contract jibe with the following claim, made in an August 26, 2005,
       news release?  "ALC follows the Atlantic Procurement Agreement, which
       ensures all interested suppliers have equal opportunity to bid on work
       for ALC."
    




For further information:

For further information: Michael Dunn, (902) 229-5378

Organization Profile

LOTTOFAIRNESS.CA

More on this organization


Custom Packages

Browse our custom packages or build your own to meet your unique communications needs.

Start today.

CNW Membership

Fill out a CNW membership form or contact us at 1 (877) 269-7890

Learn about CNW services

Request more information about CNW products and services or call us at 1 (877) 269-7890