Field Law celebrates office opening in Calgary's legendary Lougheed Building



    Move to historic property signifies proud past and bold future for law
    firm and Calgary

    CALGARY, Nov. 27 /CNW/ - Field Law today marked its relocation to the
legendary Lougheed Building, with a reception celebrating the property's
significance to Alberta's heritage.
    "The Lougheed Building is an important landmark and we feel our lengthy
firm history blends well with these surroundings," said Miles Atkinson Q.C.,
counsel for Field Law. Whenever we're working in our offices or hosting
clients we'll be inspired by our environment, what the Lougheed Building means
to our history and how pleased we are with its restoration."
    The Lougheed Building was constructed in 1912, three years before the
firm that is now Field Law was established. The building later fell on hard
times and was slated for demolition, but the efforts of a dedicated group led
by Alison Robertson helped to save the building. University professor Don
Smith later wrote the history of both the Lougheed Building and Grand Theatre
in CALGARY'S GRAND STORY (Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2005).
    "Field Law's relocation to this important building is a vote of
confidence for Calgary's heritage," Professor Smith said. "It reinforces
efforts to ensure that while Calgarians look toward a promising future, we
also celebrate our past."
    "We're thrilled to have a firm with the prestige of Field Law in the
Lougheed Building," added Neil Richardson, President of Heritage Property
Corporation, the company that purchased and restored the Lougheed Building.
"It's a perfect match - an attractive venerable headquarters for a prestigious
group of legal professionals." The reception on Tuesday, November 27, attended
by noteworthy Calgarians, was preceded by a media tour to highlight the work
that has gone into the property.

    About Field Law

    Field Law has been serving clients since 1915. With more than 100 lawyers
and a staff of approximately 200 people in our offices in Calgary, Edmonton
and Yellowknife and offer a comprehensive range of services to serve clients
efficiently throughout Alberta and the Northwest Territories. In 1996 Field &
Field Perraton merged with Atkinson Milvain to become Field Atkinson Perraton.
As of May 1, 2003 we began operating under our new name Field Law. We are
proud of our heritage, excited by our future and proud members of the
communities in which we do business. Whether you are an individual client, an
owner-managed business, an institution or a multi-national corporation, when
you retain a lawyer at Field Law, you receive the benefit of our client
focused approach and the collective experience of all our lawyers and our
global affiliates.

    
                                 Backgrounder

                  Field Law and Calgary's Lougheed Building
    

    When the Lougheed Building and its adjacent Grand Theatre were built in
1912, Calgary was a boomtown of 50,000 people. The Lougheed opened with great
fanfare and soon became the city's premier corporate address. Its mixture of
solid elegance and cultural vibrancy reflected the shared vision of James
Alexander Lougheed, then a federal cabinet minister and one of Calgary's
largest landowners, and his wife Belle Hardisty Lougheed.
    The Lougheed Building was done in an architectural style called Chicago
Commercial - constructed of reinforced concrete with a steel frame and clad in
brick with sandstone blocks. It is marked by its original large windows and
still contains many of the original fixtures. Its tenants included the
heavyweights of Alberta's then-agriculture dominated economy; the United
Farmers of Alberta, Alberta Wheat Pool, the United Grain Growers and the
influential farmers' movement leader Henry Wise Wood, who actually lived in
the building as well as worked there.
    In its heyday, the Grand Theatre became the hub of Calgary's thriving
cultural community. It hosted performances by luminaries including Fred
Astaire, Sarah Bernhardt, Harry Lauder, the Dumbells comedy, Kathleen Parlow,
Ethel Barrymore, the Marx Brothers, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Jack Benny,
Julia Arthur, Frits Kreisler, Marion Anderson, Artur Rubenstein, Yehudi
Menuhun and Paul Robeson.
    The Grand Theatre also provided a stage for local performers and a home
for community meetings. On one occasion during the First World War, the
present, past and a future Prime Minister of Canada all addressed political
meeting in the theatre: Sir Robert Borden, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and R.B.
Bennett.
    In 1932, the Duke of Bessborough, Governor General of Canada announced at
the Grand details about the new Dominion Drama Festival. Nearly 20 years later
the Grand hosted the Canada-wide Dominion Drama Festival. Live performance
ceased at the Grand in the 1950s and it became a movie theatre.
    In later years, as Calgary's economy boomed and the city grew toward its
current size and importance, the Lougheed Building appeared doomed to be
demolished. The city granted a demolition permit in 2000. But the building was
saved through the strenuous efforts of a dedicated group led by Alison
Robertson. Donald Smith of the University of Calgary, who began documenting
the building's rich history authored the book "Calgary's Grand Story"
celebrating Alberta's Centennial. In 2003, Heritage Property Corporation
bought the Lougheed building and since then it has been restored.
    Field Law has been serving clients since 1915. With more than 100 lawyers
and a staff of approximately 200 people in our offices in Calgary, Edmonton
and Yellowknife and offer a comprehensive range of services to serve clients
efficiently throughout Alberta and the Northwest Territories.
    In 1996 Field & Field Perraton merged with Atkinson Milvain to become
Field Atkinson Perraton. As of May 1, 2003 the firm began operating under its
new name, Field Law. Field Law is proud of its heritage, excited by the future
and a proud member of the communities in which it does business.




For further information:

For further information: Heather Hild, Field Law, (403) 260-8502, (403)
880-3754 (cell), hhild@fieldlaw.com

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