Daylight Saving Time Starts This Weekend



    New Dates For DST Keep Ontario In Sync With Other Jurisdictions

    TORONTO, March 8 /CNW/ - This weekend is the first time that Ontario
clocks will "spring forward" three weeks earlier, on the second Sunday in
March, under extended daylight saving time, Parliamentary Assistant David
Zimmer announced today on behalf of Attorney General Michael Bryant.
    Ontarians should move their clocks ahead one hour before going to bed on
Saturday night, and make sure all computers and other household devices have
the correct time on Sunday morning. Daylight saving time will begin at 2 a.m.
on Sunday, March 11.
    "This change will help to keep our economy competitive, and may help
conserve energy and reduce accidents," said Zimmer. "Ontario families and
businesses will also enjoy an extra hour of daylight in the late afternoon."
    "Keeping daylight saving time in sync with the United States, our most
important economic partner, is essential for trade and good for Ontario
businesses," said Len Crispino, President and Chief Executive Officer of the
Ontario Chamber of Commerce.
    Under a recent amendment to the Time Act, daylight saving time will now
start on the second Sunday in March, and end one week later than in the past,
on the first Sunday in November, for a total extension of four weeks each
year. Similar changes have been adopted within the past year by most Canadian
provinces and territories, as well as by the United States, the first to
announce a change.
    In July 2005, Bryant created an inter-ministerial committee, led by
Zimmer, to look into the advantages and disadvantages of changing daylight
saving time. The committee reviewed public safety, energy, trade and other
issues, and consulted with stakeholders and other levels of government.
    The committee heard from 23 groups representing the agriculture,
education, energy, financial, industry, transportation and other sectors. The
majority supported synchronizing Ontario's daylight saving time with the
United States.
    "Before making this change, we wanted to know what would be best for our
province and its people," said Bryant. "We heard from Ontarians on this
matter, and support for staying in sync with the United States was strong."
    Business groups were unanimous in recommending that Ontario stay in sync
with the United States to avoid confusion and disruption in cross-border trade
and communication. Parents and educators believed the extra late afternoon
daylight provided by the change would help keep youth active in outdoor
activities. The committee also heard that an extra daylight hour would have
the potential to reduce pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the latter part
of the afternoon.

    Disponible en français

    
                      www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca


    Backgrounder
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME
    

    The McGuinty government is extending daylight saving time, keeping
Ontario in sync with the United States, our most important trading partner,
and other Canadian jurisdictions.
    Daylight saving time in Ontario will now start on the second Sunday of
March, and end on the first Sunday in November. Previously, daylight saving
time began on the first Sunday in April, and ended on the last Sunday in
October.

    History of Daylight Saving Time

    Daylight saving time was originally instituted during the First World War
as a means to save energy in Europe, the United States and Canada. It was
cancelled at the end of the war, but many countries returned to daylight
saving time during the Second World War.
    After the Second World War, the use of daylight saving time in Ontario
was a matter of local custom and practice. Municipal by-laws dealt with
whether or not a city would observe daylight saving time. Historically,
daylight saving time began in April and ended in October.
    The United States established a formal system of time zones and daylight
saving time in 1966, and adjusted its start and end dates in 1986. In Ontario,
the Time Amendment Act, 1986, revised the Time Act to set start and finish
dates for daylight saving time, consistent with the dates set by the United
States.

    Extension of Daylight Saving Time

    In 2005, the United States passed legislation that extends daylight
saving time by four weeks, beginning on March 11, 2007, starting three weeks
earlier in the spring, and ending one week later in the fall. The McGuinty
government consulted with Ontarians to consider the advantages and
disadvantages of changing daylight saving time in this province, as well.
    An inter-ministerial committee, led by David Zimmer, Parliamentary
Assistant to Attorney General Michael Bryant, consulted with 23 stakeholder
groups representing agriculture, education, energy, finance and capital
markets, industry, trade and manufacturing, public safety, transportation and
government sectors.
    The committee heard from business groups who were unanimous in
recommending that Ontario stay in sync with the United States to avoid
confusion and disruption in cross-border trade and communication. Parents and
educators believed the extra daylight provided by the change would help keep
youth active in outdoor activities. The committee also heard that an extra
daylight hour would have the potential to reduce pedestrian injuries and
fatalities in the latter part of the afternoon.
    Ontario was one of the first Canadian jurisdictions to announce that it
will be synchronizing its daylight saving time period with the United States.
All other Canadian jurisdictions will also adopt the new dates, except
Saskatchewan, which does not use daylight saving time.

    Disponible en français

    
                      www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca
    





For further information:

For further information: David Shory, Ministry of the Attorney General,
Parliamentary Assistant's Office, (416) 453-4752 (cell); Brendan Crawley,
Ministry of the Attorney General, Communications Branch, (416) 326-2210

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