Adoption Records Now Open



    McGuinty Government Opens Records For The First Time Since 1927

    TORONTO, June 1 /CNW/ -

    NEWS

    Starting today, adopted adults and birth parents can get more information
about their past.
    Ontario is making it easier for many Ontarians to look for information
about their birth relatives. The Access to Adoption Records Act, 2008 gives
adopted adults and birth parents access to information that is currently
sealed in their adoption records. Adopted adults and birth parents can also
protect their privacy by filing a disclosure veto or no contact notice.
    Individuals should contact ServiceOntario
(http://www.ontario.ca/en/residents/111872) to apply for information from
their birth and adoption records. This service is free.

    QUOTES

    "Many of us are curious about our backgrounds. Some like to trace their
family tree. People involved in an adoption are no different. They want to
know about their past. They want to know what happened to their children. By
opening Ontario's adoption records we're helping people to learn about their
personal history, while protecting their privacy."
    - Madeleine Meilleur, Minister of Community and Social Services
(http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ministry/minister/)

    "For years, adopted individuals and birth parents have needed personal
and family information from their birth certificates and adoption records.
Today, thanks to the legislation passed by the government of Ontario,
acquiring this information is finally possible. "
    - Wendy Rowney, Coalition for Open Adoption Records

    
    QUICK FACTS

    -   Approximately 250,000 adoption orders have been filed in Ontario
        since 1921
    -   Since 1979, about 75,000 Ontarians have told the province they are
        trying to find their birth relatives
    -   Ontario is the fifth Canadian province to open its adoption records.
        British Columbia
        (http://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/adoption/releas_adopt.html),
        Alberta (http://child.alberta.ca/home/602.cfm),
        Manitoba (http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/childfam/registry.html) and
        Newfoundland and Labrador
        (http://www.gs.gov.nl.ca/gs/vs/adoption-records.stm) already have
        open records, as do the United Kingdom
       (http://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/adoptions/adoptioncontactregister/)
        and the Australian state of New South Wales
        (http://webx.newswire.ca/click/?id=029aa63eaf5eb3f).

    LEARN MORE

    Discover what adoption information
(http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/adoptioninfo/index.htm) is available, and how to
find it.

    Visit the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to learn more about
adoption
(http://www.gov.on.ca/children/english/programs/child/adoption/index.html)

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                                                   ontario.ca/community-news
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    BACKGROUNDER
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                       ONTARIO OPENS ADOPTION RECORDS
    

    Starting today, adopted adults and birth parents can get more information
about their past.
    Ontario's adoption records are now open for the first time since 1927.

    
    GETTING INFORMATION

    Once they reach the age of 18, adopted individuals can apply for copies of
their birth registration and adoption order. Birth parents can also apply once
the adopted adult has reached the age of 19. While there is no standard for
adoption orders, they may contain:

    -   The adopted person's birth name and adoptive name

    -   The date and place of birth

    -   The names of the birth parents

    PROTECTING PRIVACY

    Adopted adults and birth parents who want to protect their privacy can
also file:

    -   A notice of contact preference to specify how they would like to be
        contacted

    -   A no contact notice if they do not want to be contacted, but are
        willing to have their identifying information released

    -   A disclosure veto if the adoption was finalized before September 1,
        2008. This will prevent their identifying information from being
        released.
    

    FINDING FAMILY

    While the Access to Adoption Records Act, 2008 helps people find their
birth and adoption information, it does not help them locate their family.
People who want to get in touch with their birth relatives can add their name
to Ontario's voluntary Adoption Disclosure Register.
    These free services are offered through ServiceOntario
(http://www.ontario.ca/en/residents/111872).

    
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                                                   ontario.ca/community-news
                                                      Disponible en français
    





For further information:

For further information: Kevin Cooke, Minister's Office, (416) 325-5219;
Chris Tidey, Communications Branch, (416) 325-5760

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