Now on J-Source: Balancing transparency and objectivity; New resource to help journalists in Aboriginal communities; Brunswick News goes paywall - Nov. 30 to Dec. 6, 2011

TORONTO, Nov. 30, 2011 /CNW/ -

FEATURES

THE FUTURE OF NEWS
Transparency is a double-edged sword: Being ethical takes more than self-exposure
When two reporters got themselves fired for joining Occupy protests, some critics said their NPR bosses should get with the program: impartiality in journalism was dead, replaced by full transparency about biases and involvements. Ira Basen, returning to a theme he explored earlier this year, thinks it's more complicated than that. Link to article

THE BUSINESS OF JOURNALISM
Paywalls coming to New Brunswick, ending free access to online news
What happens when a province sees the bulk of its online news move behind a paywall? That's the question that will be answered as early as next week when the Irving-owned Brunswick News Inc. ends free access to the online counterparts of 26 of its newspapers - 18 English-language and eight French. Kelly Toughill looks at the paywall in comparison to others in the industry and why the move just might work for Brunswick News. Link to article

IMPROVING DIVERSITY COVERAGE
A journalist's guide to reporting on indigenous cultures
Duncan McCue, a UBC journalism professor and reporter for CBC's The National, has launched a website to help journalists report about Aboriginal communities. Belinda Alzner spoke with McCue about why he created the website, some challenges journalists face, and how the resource can help journalists and editors work together to overcome them. And with Attawapiskat making headlines, the guide is as timely as it is useful. Link to article

TOWN HALL
Freedom (or not) of information in Canada: Panelists agree on the latter
Canada doesn't boast the best reputation for providing uncensored documents in a timely fashion under access to information laws. And it seems be to getting worse. Canada's Information Commissioner, Suzanne Legault, journalist Jim Bronskill and lawyer Paul Schabas told a CJF forum who may be responsible for it. As Rhiannon Russell reports, it may not be all the government's fault. Link to article

EVENTS CALENDAR

IN THE NEWS

» Toronto Mayor's press secretary joins Sun
» Google and Global Editors Network launch Data Journalism Awards
» No comment from Quebecor on reported 400 layoffs
» Glen McGregor challenges Ezra Levant to disclose salary
» CRTC restricts use of musical montages on CKTF-FM and CKOI-FM
» Marci Ien announced as new co-host of Canada AM
» Court rules CBC must hand over documents to information commissioner

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TOWN HALL

I have no doubt that advertising reps at the Courier are feeling pressure every day from their clients to get some free advertising through editorial. Businesses are always looking for an edge or a way to leverage a media buy, and reps get commission for their sales so they're pushing because they need to make a living. Nothing wrong with that; it's a dance that's been going on since newspapers have been printed.But everybody should be in on discussions about how to handle these requests, from the publisher to the editor to the reporters to the ad reps ... (see story for more)
Reader: Joe Banks
Article: She said, he said: two accounts of editorial independence in a B.C. community newspaper

SOURCE News - Media

For further information:

The Canadian Journalism Foundation
La Fondation pour le journalisme canadien
59 Adelaide St. E, Ste 500 / Toronto, ON / M5C 1K6
416-955-0630 / programs@cjf-fjc.ca http://cjf-fjc.ca


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