NATURAL RESOURCES MAKE CANADA'S NORTHWEST VERY WEALTHY, BUT NORTHERNERS STILL FALLING BEHIND COMPARED TO SOUTH

www.conferenceboard.ca

OTTAWA, Feb. 16 /CNW/ - Canada's Northwest, specifically the Northwest Territories and Northern Alberta, is home to the highest gross domestic product (GDP) per person in the country. Yet the Northern parts of three other provinces - Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec - are among the regions with the lowest GDP per capita in Canada.

Overall, GDP per person in Northern Canada trails that of the South by about $5,000 per person, a gap that has widened over the past decade, according to a groundbreaking analysis published by The Conference Board of Canada's Centre for the North (http://www.centreforthenorth.ca/).

"Natural resources have made the Northwest Territories and Northern Alberta the two regions with the highest per capita GDP in the country. Mining and oil and gas have been the strongest industries in the North over the past decade. The public sector also plays a major part in the Northern economy," said Jacqueline Palladini, Economist, and author of Estimating Economic Activity in Canada's Northern Regions. (http://www.conferenceboard.ca/e-library/abstract.aspx?did=4029).

"Despite the wealth being created in parts of the North, overall GDP-per-capita in Northern Canada remains lower than in Southern Canada. And this gap widened between 1999 and 2009."

Overall, the North's GDP per capita was $33,500 in 2009, compared to $38,500 in the South. The Northwest Territories ($71,200) and Northern Alberta ($51,100) led all regions in the country. Southern Alberta ($46,000) and Yukon ($44,300) also had real GDP per capita above $40,000.

In 2009, Northern Manitoba had the lowest GDP per-capita of all Northern or Southern regions, at $17,900. GDP per capita for all Northern and Southern regions is available from the Centre for the North's newest Here, the North map, Land of Opportunity (http://www.centreforthenorth.ca/blogs/herethenorth/landofopportunity).

Real GDP in Canada's Northern regions - which includes the three territories and the Northern parts of seven provinces - amounted to $84.8 billion in 2009 (in 2002 dollars). The North's share of national GDP declined from 7.6 per cent in 1999 to 6.6 per cent in 2009—slightly less than its share of Canada's population.

Primary industries - forestry, mining, fishing and hunting - make up the largest sector of the northern economy, at $16.2 billion. Non-commercial services, such as health and education, made up almost $11 billion. Public administration (government) made up a further $5.3 billion. Construction, mostly related to mining projects, was the fastest-growing sector in the North between 1999 and 2009.

Most Centre for the North research uses the Northern Ministers Development Forum definition of the North. Because this analysis uses Statistics Canada's economic regions from the Labour Force Survey, the area defined as the North is slightly larger than for other research in the Centre for the North. The regions included in this analysis are:

  • Newfoundland and Labrador — West Coast/Northern Peninsula/Labrador
  • Quebec - Saguenay/Lac Saint-Jean, Cote-Nord, and Nord-du-Quebec
  • Ontario - Northeast and Northwest (large cities are Sudbury and Thunder Bay)
  • Manitoba - Parklands and North
  • Saskatchewan - Prince Albert and Northern
  • Alberta - Wood Buffalo/Cold Lake and Athabaska/Grande Prairie/Peace River
  • British Columbia - Cariboo, North Coast, Nechako, and Northeast

In this analysis, the North covers 85 per cent of Canada's land mass and is home to about 2.5 million people, representing 7.5 per cent of Canada's population. To obtain GDP and GDP per capita, employment by industry in each Northern region is multiplied by overall provincial productivity for that industry, and aggregated.

Now into its second year, the Centre for the North is a Conference Board of Canada program of research and dialogue. Its main purpose is to work with Aboriginal leaders, businesses, governments, communities, educational institutions, and other organizations to provide insights into how sustainable prosperity can be achieved in the North. Over its five-year mandate, the Centre for the North will define strategies, policies and practices needed to transform that vision into reality.

SOURCE CONFERENCE BOARD OF CANADA

For further information:

Brent Dowdall, Media Relations, Tel.: 613- 526-3090 ext. 448
E-mail: corpcomm@conferenceboard.ca

Profil de l'entreprise

CONFERENCE BOARD OF CANADA

Renseignements sur cet organisme


FORFAITS PERSONNALISÉS

Jetez un coup d’œil sur nos forfaits personnalisés ou créez le vôtre selon vos besoins de communication particuliers.

Commencez dès aujourd'hui .

ADHÉSION À CNW

Remplissez un formulaire d'adhésion à CNW ou communiquez avec nous au 1-877-269-7890.

RENSEIGNEZ-VOUS SUR LES SERVICES DE CNW

Demandez plus d'informations sur les produits et services de CNW ou communiquez avec nous au 1‑877-269-7890.