Government of Canada celebrates the historical significance of Dorothy Dworkin (1889-1976)


    TORONTO, July 6 /CNW/ - The Honourable Jim Prentice, Canada's Environment
Minister and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, today celebrated the
national historic significance of Dorothy Dworkin, whom he designated a person
of national historic significance, on the recommendation of the Historic Sites
and Monuments Board of Canada.
    "I am proud to name Dorothy Dworkin a person of national historic
significance in Canada," declared Minister Prentice. "This designation will
help to ensure that her important contributions to Canada's rich cultural
heritage are appreciated and remembered by future generations."
    "Each designation has a specific message of national historic
significance, and each offers Canadians a unique opportunity to understand and
appreciate Canada's rich and diverse history," said the Honourable Jim
Flaherty, Minister of Finance. This designation reminds us all of the
contributions of this immigrant woman whose life and work illustrates the most
noble of Canadian values."
    Born in Latvia, Dorothy Dworkin immigrated with her family to Canada in
1904. She ran the free Jewish Dispensary in Toronto, and provided health and
social services to immigrant Jews. As s founder of Toronto's Mount Sinai
Hospital, she created opportunities for Jewish doctors and a place where
Jewish patients could receive services in Yiddish, obtain kosher food, and
observe their religious practices.
    Through her successful steamship agency, she brought hundreds of eastern
European Jews to Canada during the 1920s and 1930s and helped settle them into
Canadian society. As a community activist, she led fundraising campaigns for
Jewish international relief during the Holocaust, was deeply involved in the
activities of the Jewish Labour Lyceum, and sat on a number of boards for
Jewish organizations.
    "Dorothy Dworkin, my grandmother, was a pioneer nurse, community worker
and businessperson," said Mr. Arthurs, Professor Emeritus and President
Emeritus of York University. "She and her generation of immigrant women worked
hard to make life better not just for themselves but for everyone. They broke
down barriers, built institutions and changed lives. I am proud that her
contribution (and theirs) is being recognized."
    "The story of Dorothy Dworkin is a fine example of how immigrants
influenced the history of Canada and helped make it the rich and diverse
country it is today," stated the Honourable Jason Kenney, Minister of
Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism.

    Parks Canada works to ensure that Canada's historic and natural heritage
is presented and protected for the enjoyment, education, appreciation and
inspired discovery of all Canadians, today and in the future.

    (Also available on the Internet at www.pc.gc.ca under Media room.)



For further information: Robert Gratton, A/Communications Manager,
Eastern Canada Communications (Ontario), Parks Canada, (613) 938-5769