Brandeis International Business School Partners with IBM, Tests ''Serious Game'' in the Classroom


    WALTHAM, MASS., November 6 /CNW/ - Brandeis International Business School
(IBS) today announced that it has partnered with IBM (NYSE: IBM) to help
students develop a combination of business and information technology (IT)
skills required in today's global job market. As part of the new relationship,
IBM is working with Brandeis professors to begin testing the use of a new
category of video games - called "serious games" - in the classroom.

    Serious games are computer and video games used as educational and
training tools. Just as airline pilots initially learn using flight
simulators, many corporations and universities see serious games as an
effective way of teaching new skills to a generation that has been brought up
in the video game era. In fact, according to The Apply Group, by 2012, between
100 and 135 of the Global Fortune 500 will have adopted gaming for learning,
with the U.S., United Kingdom and Germany leading the way.

    IBM today introduced a new serious game entitled "Innov8" which is
designed to help university students and young professionals develop a
combination of business and IT skills. Selected for its global focus, Brandeis
International Business School is one of the first business schools in the
world to pilot the game in the classroom.

    "The establishment of this relationship with IBM illustrates how IBS is
delivering an educational experience that is intellectually rigorous and
provides the tools necessary to achieve success in the global marketplace,"
said Bruce R. Magid, Dean, Brandeis International Business School. "Developing
a blend of IT and business skills is critical for our students as they assume
leadership roles at companies and institutions around the world."

    IBM has created Innov8 as a new way to teach MBAs and young IT
professionals - many of whom have grown up playing video games - about
competing successfully in business. Innov8 is an interactive, 3-D educational
game designed to bridge the gap in understanding between IT teams and business
leaders in an organization. This type of serious gaming - simulations which
have the look and feel of a game but correspond to non-game events or
processes such as business operations - has emerged as a successful method to
train employees or develop new skills.

    IBS will be testing Innov8 in a course entitled "Technology Strategy"
which explores strategies needed to develop businesses based on new
technologies. Innov8 will be utilized to help students understand business
processes in technology firms and learn how to manage knowledge across complex
global companies.

    "IBM views serious gaming as a new and exciting way to develop the skills
that are required as business and IT become more closely aligned," said Sandy
Carter, vice president, IBM SOA and WebSphere strategy, channels and
marketing. "Innov8 was designed to address this specific skills shortage while
also helping business schools like IBS realize the benefits of using serious
games as a powerful tool for teaching today's students."

    Also announced today, Brandeis International Business School has joined
IBM's Academic Initiative, a program offering a wide range of technology
education benefits to meet the goals of colleges and universities.

    IBS is a leading global business school which prepares students from
around the world to become principled leaders in the global economy. A
critical element of the education provided to its students is mastery of the
skills necessary to succeed in the global marketplace. Accordingly, IBS joined
the IBM Academic Initiative to ensure that its curriculum stays current with
the demands of the rapidly changing marketplace.

    Note to Editors: Images and broadcast-quality b-roll are available for
download by registered journalists at www.thenewsmarket.com/ibm or by
contacting Matthew Parillo at Brandeis International Business School.

    About Brandeis International Business School

    The Brandeis International Business School, located in Waltham,
Massachusetts, focuses on preparing talented professionals for leadership
roles in the global economy. More information is available at
www.brandeis.edu/global.

    About IBM

    For more information on IBM, go to www.ibm.com/university



For further information: Brandeis International Business School Matthew
Parillo, 781-736-5206 parillo@brandeis.edu