Federal and provincial governments celebrate the completion of upgrades to Trans-Canada Highway in Saskatchewan


    MOOSOMIN, SK, Dec. 5 /CNW Telbec/ - Ed Komarnicki, Parliamentary
Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the
Minister of Labour and Member of Parliament for Souris-Moose Mountain, on
behalf of John Baird, Canada's Transport and Infrastructure Minister, together
with the Honourable Wayne Elhard, Minister of Saskatchewan Highways and
Infrastructure, today announced the completion of the twinning of the
Trans-Canada Highway (TCH) in Saskatchewan.
    "We are pleased to announce the completion of the twinning of this
section of Highway 1," said Minister Baird. "Our Government is committed to
working with its partners to identify and to accelerate transportation
infrastructure projects that help make our country and our economy stronger."
    "The Government of Canada is delivering on its commitment to improve
Canada's infrastructure," said MP Komarnicki. "Today's historic highway
completion is another example of what we are doing to put people to work,
improve road safety, and create long-term community infrastructure."
    "In 1957, Saskatchewan was the first province to complete construction of
its portion of the two-lane Trans-Canada Highway," said Minister Elhard.
"Today, we are the first province in the new west to fully twin this important
national highway, which links us to port facilities and major Canadian centres
from coast to coast. Twinning this corridor will provide us with more
efficient links to our major export markets and enhance motorist safety."
    Saskatchewan began the final stage of construction on Highway 1 East
which involved completing twinned lanes from near Wapella to east of Moosomin,
including a new bypass around Moosomin. These new lanes were opened to traffic
on November 6, 2008.
    The total cost of twinning Highway 1 was $217 million with $59 million
contributed by the Government of Canada through the Canada Strategic
Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program
(SHIP).

    For more information on the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, please
visit: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/csif-fcis-eng.html
    For more information on the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program,
please visit: http://www.tc.gc.ca/SHIP/menu.htm

    A backgrounder with further information on the Trans-Canada Highway is
attached.Backgrounder
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                   THE TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY IN SASKATCHEWAN
                   ----------------------------------------

    Highway 1 or the Trans-Canada Highway is part of the National Highway
System (NHS) and is one of the busiest transportation corridors in the
province. It is a primary east-west trade artery, a major tourism route, and a
key land link from coast to coast across Canada.
    Highway 1 is 655 km in length across Saskatchewan. Average daily traffic
in Saskatchewan varies from a low of 4,700 vehicles per day between Maple
Creek and Gull Lake, to a high of 22,800 immediately east of the City of
Regina.

    History

    Construction on the two-lane Trans-Canada Highway in Saskatchewan began in
1950 and was completed in 1957. Saskatchewan was the first province to
complete its section of the national highway, originally cost-shared with the
federal government and built to agreed standards nation-wide.
    Four-lane construction on this highway began in 1960 with the first 21 km
twinned section opened from Regina east to Balgonie by 1962. The last section
of twinned highway around Moosomin was opened to traffic on November 6, 2008,
48 years later.

    Timeline - Highway 1 West of Regina:

    - 1967-70 - Regina to 2.8 km east of the Mortlach access; and from Swift
      Current to 1 km west of the Junction of Highway 32
    - 1968 - west of the Junction with Highway 4 at Swift Current to 5.3 km
      east of Swift Current
    - 1971-72 - 3 km east of Herbert to 5.3 km east of Swift Current; and
      2 km east of the Mortlach Access to 7 km east of Chaplin
    - 1975-76 - 7 km east of Chaplin to 3 km east of Herbert
    - 1983 - west of the Junction with Highway 32 to west of Webb
    - 1987-88 - Gull Lake to 5 km west of Gull Lake; and west of Webb to Gull
      Lake
    - 1999 - 5 km west of Gull Lake to west of Tompkins
    - 2001 - from the Alberta border to 19 km east
    - 2002 - 19 km east of the Alberta border to 3 km east of Highway 21
    - 2003 - 3 km east of Highway 21 to 8.5 km west of Tompkins

    Timeline - Highway 1 East of Regina:

    - 1961-62 - Regina to 2 km east of Balgonie
    - 1972 - Balgonie to 1 km east of Qu'Appelle
    - 1984 - 1 km east of Qu'Appelle to 3.8 km east of Indian Head
    - 2001 - 3.8 km east of Indian Head to 3.8 km east of Wolseley
    - 2004 - 3.8 km east of Wolseley to 5.9 km west of Broadview
    - 2005 - 5.9 km west of Broadview to 3 km west of Whitewood
    - 2006 - 3 km west of Whitewood to 1.5 km west of Burrows
    - 2007 - 1.5 km west of Burrows to 3.6 km east of Wapella
    - 2007 - Manitoba border to 3 km east of Moosomin
    - 2008 - 3.6 km east of Wapella to 3 km east of Moosomin

    Highway 1 East

    - Twinning on Highway 1 East did not advance for most of the 1990s.
    - In 1997, a target to complete twinning Highway 1 East from Indian Head
      to the Manitoba border (168 km) was set for 2012.
    - New construction timelines were set in March of 2003 following the
      announcement of a funding partnership between the provincial and
      federal governments. Twinning Highway 1 East was accelerated to 2007.
    - Construction began on the 168 km corridor between Indian Head and the
      Manitoba border in 1998. The province has invested $107.1 million to
      complete this corridor while $50.3 million has been contributed by the
      federal government.

    Highway 1 West

    - In 1997, a target to complete twinning Highway 1 West from west of Gull
      Lake to the Alberta border (108 km) was set for 2008.
    - New construction timelines were set in March of 2003 following the
      announcement of a funding partnership between the provincial and
      federal governments. Twinning Highway 1 West was accelerated to 2003.
    - Construction began on the 108 km corridor between Gull Lake and the
      Alberta border in 1998. The province has invested $50.9 million to
      complete this corridor while $8.8 million has been contributed by the
      federal government.

                                                               December 2008
For further information: Chris Day, Press Secretary, Office of Transport
and Infrastructure, Minister John Baird, Ottawa, (613) 991-0700; Kirsten
Leatherdale, Highways and Infrastructure, Government of Saskatchewan, (306)
787-8484, (306) 536-9692; Media Relations, Transport Canada, Ottawa, (613)
993-0055; Transport Canada is online at www.tc.gc.ca. Subscribe to news
releases and speeches at www.tc.gc.ca/e-news and keep up to date on the latest
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