Need a source?: Envisioning lifelong learning this International Literacy Day

International Literacy Day on September 8 reminds Canadians to nurture our vision for lifelong learning

Eighty per cent of children's learning takes place visually, making eye health a key factor for children to reach their potential

-  Speak with a schoolboy impacted by eyesight problems and the experts who helped restore his and others' vision for ongoing learning and success -

TORONTO, Sept. 5, 2014 /CNW/ - For children, 80 per cent of learning happens visually, and as we celebrate access to literacy this September 8th, it's an important reminder to protect one of our key resources for lifelong learning – our eyesight.

One-in-four school-aged children has a vision problem, but unfortunately, with very few or no symptoms, vision problems can be difficult for parents and caregivers to identify. It's crucial to have vision problems addressed before the eyes fully develop, making the early years of childhood an important time to set children up for a lifetime of literacy.

Canada's Doctors of Optometry work each and every day for better eye health for Canadians, and are available to share with you their stories of the role eye health plays in education.

  • Hunter was a bright and inquisitive boy, who picked up new things and clearly articulated the world around him. But upon entering school, eye health problems slowed him down, preventing Hunter from learning at his full potential. Five-year-old Hunter and his mom Ashley are available to speak to how correcting Hunter's vision problems has opened up a whole new world of learning for Hunter today and in the future.

  • Doctor of Optometry Asim Prasad treats Hunter's eye health issues, and can speak to how Hunter and other children with undiagnosed vision problems see the world around them - and the simple steps that can allow children to reach their full potential through healthy vision. 

  • Doctor of Optometry Jeff Goodhew is the co-chair of the Canadian Association of Optometrists' National Public Education Committee, and can speak about how vision affects learning, signs and symptoms of poor vision health, and how Canadians can preserve their vision and ability to learn visually for as long as possible.

SOURCE Canadian Association of Optometrists

For further information: Stephanie Weiland / Cynthia Innes, 416-850-0711 / 416-849-1998, Stephanie.Weiland@edelman.com / Cynthia.Innes@edelman.com