Most Ontario students can read, write and do math well by the time they are in high school. Most who can't do so have a trait in common—they couldn't in elementary school either.

TORONTO, Feb. 19, 2014 /CNW/ -

NEWS

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) has released a research report that tracks students as they advanced through Ontario's four provincial tests from 2004 to 2012. This cohort tracking shows that the majority of students are developing solid reading, writing and math skills by the time they are in high school. However, the majority of those who aren't have a trait in common: they also struggled in elementary school.

QUICK FACTS

  • Eighty-three percent of students were successful on the Grade 10 literacy test (the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test, or OSSLT) in 2011-2012, and 84% of students in the academic course met the provincial standard on the Grade 9 provincial math test. (More than 70% of all math students are enrolled in the academic course.)
  • Fifty-one percent of students who did not meet the reading standard in Grade 3 and also did not in Grade 6 failed the OSSLT. The failure rate was more than 25 times higher for these students than for those who met the standard in both grades.
  • More than half of students who did not meet the math standard in Grade 3 and also did not in Grade 6 failed to meet it on the Grade 9 test (academic). Fully 70% of students who did not meet the standard in Grade 3 and also did not meet it in Grade 6 failed to meet it on the Grade 9 test (applied).
  • Students with special education needs who struggled early in their schooling had a particular risk of continuing to struggle in high school.
  • Early struggles can be overcome. EQAO's cohort tracking shows that 85% of students who failed to meet the reading standard in Grade 3 but met it in Grade 6 were also successful on the OSSLT. In math, 77% of students who failed to meet the standard in Grade 3 but met it in Grade 6 also met it on the Grade 9 test (academic). Sixty-one percent of students who failed to meet the math standard in Grade 3 but met it in Grade 6 also met it on the Grade 9 test (applied).

QUOTES

"It's abundantly clear that students who struggle early in their schooling are most at risk of lacking fundamental reading, writing and math skills in high school. The right supports need to be put in place for these students to help them overcome their weaknesses and become successful."
Brian Desbiens, Chair, EQAO Board of Directors

"This latest research is an important reminder that educators and parents need to pay close attention to students' results on the provincial assessments. If a student is not meeting the provincial standard in elementary school, it's a red flag that he or she may be up to 25 times more likely to carry that struggle into secondary school. Such students need immediate and meaningful interventions to change their path toward lasting success.
Bruce Rodrigues, Chief Executive Officer, EQAO

LEARN MORE

Infographic: "Some students are 25 times more likely to lack basic literacy skills in high school"

EQAO Research Bulletin #13: "Tracking the Longitudinal Performance of Students in Mathematics"

EQAO Research Bulletin #14: "Tracking the Longitudinal Performance of Students in Literacy"

EQAO Research Report: "Longitudinal Results of Province-Wide Assessments in English-Language Schools: Trends in Student Achievement and Implications for Improvement Planning in Mathematics and Literacy"

Aussi disponible en français

About EQAO Research

EQAO's research program is dedicated to promoting the use of EQAO data for improved student achievement. The agency's research projects examine the various factors that influence student achievement and education quality in order to inform decisions made by educators, school board administrators, parents and the government.

SOURCE Education Quality and Accountability Office

For further information:

For further information and to arrange interviews, please contact
Kathleen Garrett
Senior Communications Officer
416-325-9902
kathleen.garrett@eqao.com