Federal Minister of Labour Invites Secondary School Students to Promote Workplace Safety

The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch Officially Launches "It's Your Job!" Video Contest

TORONTO, Feb. 7, 2014 /CNW/ - High school students across Canada are invited to spread the word about staying safe on the job thanks to the second annual "It's Your Job!" video contest. The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women, was at Central Technical School in Toronto today, where she encouraged students from coast to coast to participate in this nationwide competition.

The contest challenges secondary school students to develop an original social media video that illustrates the importance of working safely on the job.

Students can participate through their province or territory. The provincial and territorial winners will become eligible for two national awards: one chosen by a group of judges and another that allows Canadians to vote for their favourite.

Quick Facts

  • Young workers have a higher risk of being injured on the job.
  • Approximately one-quarter of all occupational injuries happen to workers between the ages of 15 and 29.
  • In 2011, 68 workers aged 15 to 29 died in the workplace in Canada.
  • Provincial and territorial video contest winners will be selected by spring 2014.
  • The first place high school video at the national finals will be awarded $2,000, second place will be awarded $1,500, and third place will be awarded $1,000.

Quotes

"As an orthopedic surgeon, I have seen the devastating impact that workplace injuries have on young Canadians. Young people are more likely than adults to be injured on the job. Approximately one-quarter of all occupational injuries happen to workers between the ages of 15 and 29. That's why, as the federal Minister of Labour, I am encouraging young Canadians to get involved and help spread the word about workplace health and safety. The 'It's Your Job!' video contest is the perfect opportunity to illustrate the importance of working safely on the job."

The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch
Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women

Associated links

It's Your Job! - Video Contest 2014

Backgrounder

  • From 2005 to 2007, of roughly 2.7 million full-time workers, nearly 10 percent were between 15 and 24 years of age.

  • Approximately one-quarter of all occupational injuries happen to workers between the ages of 15 and 29.

  • A 2006 Canadian Research Data Centre Network study of over 14 500 Canadians aged 15 to 24 concluded that many young people sustain work injuries that have significant medical costs and potential long-term health consequences. Many factors contribute to this, including a lack of job experience, training and development.

  • More than half of the serious injuries and fatalities involving workers aged 15 to 24 occur during the first six months on the job and almost 20 percent occur during the first month on the job.1

  • From 2005 to 2011, male workers aged 15-24 had a rate of injury that was on average two times higher than that of females.

  • In 2011, the most commonly reported types of workplace injuries were a result of overexertion (20%) and being struck by an object (18%).

  • In 2011, half of all workplace injuries among youth and young adults were in the following industries: manufacturing (18%), construction (16%) and retail (16%).

____________________________________

1 Worksafe BC, Young Worker FAQ

SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada

For further information:

Barbara Mottram
Director of Communications
Office of Minister Leitch
819-953-5646

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Follow us on Twitter