Despite Growth in Digital Media, Canadian News Seekers Still Rely on Traditional Sources for Daily News

4 in 10 (39%) Canadians Highly Engaged 'Newsies'
Whereas Majority (60%) Are More Casual, Remote

TORONTO, Oct. 17, 2012 /CNW/ -A new poll conducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of The Canadian Journalism Foundation finds that despite a plethora of new sources for the apparent 24/7 news cycle, a majority of Canadians still prefer to consult the more traditional outlets to get their daily news fill.

The list below ranks these sources from always daily consulted to least consulted in helping Canadians get their daily news fill.

In ranked order:

  • 40% of Canadians say they always consult daily a regular newscast on a TV station for either evening or late broadcast for their daily news fill
  • 23% of Canadians say they always consult daily a daily newspaper that they would normally pay for or subscribe to for their daily news fill
  • 19% of Canadians say they always consult daily community newspapers and magazines for their daily news fill
  • 17% of Canadians say they always consult daily a television station dedicated to only news or information 24 hours a day for their daily news fill
  • 14% of Canadians say they always consult daily a free newspaper that people hand out or make available around town for their daily news fill
  • 14% of Canadians say they always consult CBC Radio news broadcasts to get their daily news fill
  • 13% of Canadians say they always consult daily newspaper websites for their daily news fill
  • 13% of Canadians say they always consult daily social media sites like Facebook for their daily news fill
  • 12% of Canadians say they always consult talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news broadcasts on the half hour
  • 11% of Canadians say they always consult daily television stations dedicated to only business news and information for their daily news fill
  • 10% of Canadians say they always consult daily online news sources like TV news websites for their daily news fill
  • 7% of Canadians say they always consult daily news aggregators like 'Google News' for their daily news fill
  • 7% of Canadians say they always consult 24-hour news-only radio stations
  • 3% of Canadians say they always consult daily magazines, like Maclean's and Time, and their websites for their daily news fill
  • 3% of Canadians say they always consult daily dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg for their daily news fill
  • 3% of Canadians say they always consult daily the popular micro-blogging medium, Twitter, making it the least consulted source amongst Canadians

The following table outlines in full detail how much Canadians 'consult' or 'don't consult' each available media source:



News Source Medium




Consult      

 

Don't Consult


A regular newscast on a TV station for either
evening or late broadcast

74% (40% always/34%
sometimes)
26%
Community newspapers and magazines
60% (19% always/41%
sometimes)
40%

A television station dedicated to only news or
information 24 hours a day

54% (17% always/37%
sometimes)
46%

A free newspaper that people hand out or
make available around town

51% (14% always/37%
sometimes)
49%

Talk radio stations with regularly scheduled
news broadcasts on the half hour

46% (12% always/34%
sometimes)
54%

A daily newspaper you would normally pay
for or subscribe to

43% (23% always/20%
sometimes)
57%
CBC Radio news broadcasts
43% (14% always/28%
sometimes)

57%

A television station dedicated to only business
news and information

42% (11% always/31%
sometimes)
58%
A newspaper website
41% (13% always/28%
sometimes)

59%
A TV news website
36% (10% always/26%
sometimes)

64%
Social media sites like Facebook

35% (13% always/22%
sometimes)

65%
A news aggregator like 'Google News'

30% (7% always/24%
sometimes)

70%
24-hour news-only radio stations

28% (7% always/21%
sometimes)

72%

Magazines and their sites like Maclean's or
Time


20% (3% always/17%
sometimes)

80%

Dedicated news services like Reuters or
Bloomberg


14% (3% always/11%
sometimes)
86%

Twitter


10% (3% always/7%
sometimes)

90%

What Kind of News Seekers Are Canadians?

The poll also set out to examine Canadians and their desire to get the news. Respondents were asked to identify with one of four categories to determine which kind of "Newsie" they are:

  1. I'm a 'hyper newsie' (10%) - I check the news all the time and depend on numerous sources to get it - ranging from newspapers and newspaper sites to news aggregators, Twitter.
  2. I'm a 'moderate newsie' (29%) - I check the news a few times a day when I really need to or am interested and depend on a few sources to get it ranging from newspapers and newspaper sites to news aggregators, Twitter.
  3. I'm a 'casual newsie' (42%) - I check on the news once and awhile in a given day from some regular sources and times that I pretty much stick to.
  4. I'm really a 'non - newsie' (18%) - I don't seek out or care much about the news unless it's really something that's big or affects me directly.

In essence, the self identification grouped Canadians into two main news engaged/seeking categories: those who are highly engaged (39%) and those who are more remotely engaged (60%).  Those who are highly engaged consider themselves to be either a 'hyper newsie' (10%) or 'moderate newsie' (29%), while those who are remotely engaged are 'casual newsies' (42%) or 'non-newsies' (18%).

  • 'Hyper Newsies' are twice as likely to be male (14% vs. 7 % female) and tend to be from Western Canada (predominantly from Alberta - 18% and British Columbia - 15%) or Atlantic Canada (11%).  Twice as many middle-aged Canadians (12%) and Canadian seniors (12%) consider themselves 'hyper-newsies' in comparison to younger Canadians (6%).  They are most likely to be university graduates (12%), have high incomes ($100,000+ annually - 15%), and to be parents (12%).

  • 'Moderate Newsies' are slightly more likely to be male (31% vs. 28% female), a senior over the age of 55 (32%), and from Alberta (36%) or Ontario (34%).  'Moderate Newsies' are also the most likely to be considered 'middle class' or 'middle income' (55%, annual income of between $40-$99,000) earners.

  • 'Casual Newsies' are slightly more likely to be male (43% vs. 41% women) and be under the age of 55 (43% - 18-34 and 44% - 35-54).  'Casual Newsies' are most likely found in the Prairie Provinces (Saskatchewan and Manitoba - 55%) and Quebec (51%) and least likely to be from Alberta (30%).  Interestingly, 'casual newsies' are equally, and most, likely to be Canadians earning the lowest annual income (44%, under $40,000 annually) and those who earn the highest incomes (44%, $100,000+ annually).

  • 'Non-Newsies' are twice as likely to be female (24% vs. 12% male) and be under the age of 35 (27%).  'Non-Newsies' are most likely to be from Quebec (23%) or British Columbia (19%), revealing an interesting polarization within British Columbia as the province also had one of the highest proportions of 'Hyper Newsies'.  They are also most likely to be lower middle income (21%, $40-$59,000 annually) earners.

'Newsies' Preferred Sources...

The following are the sources that each 'newsie' group ranked as those they consult for news:

More than eight in ten (84%) 'hyper newsies' consult  a regular newscast on a TV station for either evening or late night broadcast, while three-quarters consult community newspapers and magazines (75%) and television stations dedicated to only news and information 24 hours a day (73%).  Rounding out the top five most consulted outlets for 'hyper newsies' are newspaper websites (71%) and CBC Radio news broadcasts (70%).  Less than two in ten (17%) 'hyper newsies' say they consult Twitter for their daily news fill, which is half as likely to be consulted as the next lowest choice, magazines like Maclean's and Time and their sites (35%).


Sources Consulted by 'Hyper Newsies' (10%)


Medium

Consult
Don't Consult


A regular newscast on a TV station for either evening or
late night broadcast


84% (66% always/18%
sometimes)
16%


Community newspapers and magazines


75% (34% always/41%
sometimes)
25%


A television station dedicated to only news or
information 24 hours a day


73% (35% always/38%
sometimes)
27%


A newspaper website


71% (35% always/35%
sometimes)
29%


CBC Radio news broadcasts


70% (46% always/24%
sometimes)
30%


A television station dedicated to only business news
and information


66% (26% always/40%
sometimes)
34%


A daily newspaper you would normally pay for or
subscribe to


60% (39% always/21%
sometimes)
40%


A TV news website


60% (30% always/30%
sometimes)
40%


Talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news
broadcasts on the half hour


54% (26% always/28%
sometimes)
46%


A free newspaper that people hand out or make
available around town


52% (17% always/35%
sometimes)
48%


24-hours news-only radio stations


52% (22% always/29%
sometimes)
48%


A news aggregator like 'Google News'


49% (21% always/28%
sometimes)
51%


Social media sites like Facebook


45% (22% always/24%
sometimes)
55%


Dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg


37% (11% always/25%
sometimes)
63%


Magazines and their sites like Maclean's or Time


35% (7% always/28%
sometimes)
65%


Twitter


17% (7% always/10%
sometimes)
83%

Evening and late night TV newscasts (81%), community newspapers and magazines (71%), and 24-hour news and information stations (63%) are also the most consulted sources for 'moderate newsies'.  The same number (56%) of this group consults with free newspapers that people hand out or make available around town and newspaper websites.  Just over one in ten 'moderate newsies' say they consult dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg (14%) and Twitter (12%).



Sources Consulted by 'Moderate Newsies' (29%)


Medium

Consult Don't Consult


A regular newscast on a TV station for either
evening or late night broadcast


81% (48% always/32%
sometimes)
19%

Community newspapers and magazines

71% (24% always/46%
sometimes)
29%


A television station dedicated to only news or
information 24 hours a day


63% (22% always/40%
sometimes)
37%

A free newspaper that people hand out or make
available around town

56% (16% always/41%
sometimes)
44%

A newspaper website

56% (20% always/36%
sometimes)
44%

Talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news
broadcasts on the half hour

53% (15% always/38%
sometimes)
47%

A television station dedicated to only business news
and information

51% (15% always/36%
sometimes)
49%

A TV news website

51% (16% always/35%
sometimes)
49%

A daily newspaper you would normally pay for
or subscribe to

49% (28% always/22%
sometimes)
51%

CBC Radio news broadcasts

46% (15% always/31%
sometimes)
54%

Social media sites like Facebook
39% (15% always/24%
sometimes)
61%

A news aggregator like 'Google News'

37% (8% always/29%
sometimes)
63%

24-hour news-only radio stations

29% (7% always/22%
sometimes)
71%

Magazines and their sites like Maclean's and Time

27% (3% always/23%
sometimes)
73%

Dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg

14% (2% always/12%
sometimes)
86%

Twitter

12% (3% always/9%
sometimes)
88%

Eight in ten (78%) 'casual newsies' consult regular newscasts on a TV station for either evening or late night broadcast to get their daily news fill.  Six in ten (57%) say they consult community newspapers and magazines and 24-hour news and information stations, revealing a sizeable gap between the most consulted media by 'casual newsies'.  A majority (53%) consult free newspapers that people hand out or make available, while four in ten (44%) 'casual newsies' consult talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news broadcasts on the half hour.  Less than two in ten who consider themselves 'casual newsies' say they consult magazines like Maclean's and Times and their sites (16%) and dedicated news services like Reuters and Bloomberg (12%), while less than one in ten (9%) consult Twitter.


Sources Consulted by 'Casual Newsies' (42%)


Medium

Consult Don't Consult

A regular newscast on a TV station for either
evening or late night broadcast

78% (39% always/39%
sometimes)
22%

Community newspapers and magazines

57%/ (17% always/40%
sometimes)
43%

A television station dedicated to only news or
information 24 hours a day

57% (14% always/44%
sometimes)
43%

A free newspaper that people hand out or make
available around town

53% (15% always/38%
sometimes)
47%

Talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news
broadcasts on the half hour

44% (11%/always/33%
sometimes)
56%

A daily newspaper you would normally pay for or
subscribe to

43% (23% always/20%
sometimes)
57%

CBC Radio news broadcasts

42% (11% always/30%
sometimes)
58%

A television station dedicated to only business news
and information

39% (9% always/31%
sometimes)
61%

A newspaper website

34% (7% always/27%
sometimes)
66%

Social media sites like Facebook

30% (8% always/22%
sometimes)
70%

A TV news website

29% (5% always/23%
sometimes)
71%

24-hour news-only radio stations

27% (5% always/22%
sometimes)
73%

A news aggregator like 'Google News'

26% (3% always/23%
sometimes)
74%

Magazines and their sites like Maclean's or Time

16% (2% always/14%
sometimes)
84%

Dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg

12% (1% always/10%
sometimes)
88%

Twitter

9% (3% always/7%
sometimes)
91%

There is no specific news source that a majority of 'non-newsies' consult on a daily basis for their news fill.  A slim minority (46%) consult regular TV evening or late night news broadcasts, while four in ten consult free newspapers that hand out or make available around town (40%) or community newspapers and magazines (39%).  'Non-newsies' are the most likely to have social media sites such as Facebook (35%) in their top five most consulted news sources.  One-third (31%) of 'non-newsies' say they consult talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news broadcasts on the half hour.  Less than one in ten 'non-newsies' consult magazines like Maclean's and Time and their sites (8%), dedicated news services like Reuters and Bloomberg (6%), and Twitter (6%).


Sources Consulted by 'Non-Newsies' (18%)


Medium

Consult Don't Consult

A regular newscast on a TV station for either
evening or late night broadcast


46% (12% always/35%
sometimes)
54%

A free newspaper that people hand out or make
available around town

40% (8% always/32%
sometimes)
60%

Community newspapers and magazines

39% (7% always/32%
sometimes)
61%

Social media sites like Facebook

35% (16% always/19%
sometimes)
65%

Talk radio stations with regularly scheduled news
broadcasts on the half hour

31% (3% always/28%
sometimes)
69%

A television station dedicated to only news or
information 24 hours a day

22% (3% always/19%
sometimes)
78%

A daily newspaper you would normally pay for or
subscribe to

22% (5% always/17%
sometimes)
78%

CBC Radio news broadcasts

22% (2% always/20%
sometimes)
78%

A news aggregator like 'Google News'

20% (4% always/15%
sometimes)
80%

A television station dedicated to only business news
or information

19% (2% always/17%
sometimes)
81%

A newspaper website

17% (3% always/13%
sometimes)
83%

24-hour news-only radio stations

15% (4% always/11%
sometimes)
85%

A TV news website

15% (1% always/13%
sometimes)
85%

Magazines and their sites like Maclean's or Time

8% (1% always/6%
sometimes)
92%

Dedicated news services like Reuters or Bloomberg

6% (2% always/4%
sometimes)
94%

Twitter

6% (2% always/4%
sometimes)
94%

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos Reid poll conducted between October 4th to 15th, 2012, on behalf of The Canadian Journalism Foundation. For this survey, a sample of 1,006 Canadians from Ipsos' Canadian online panel was interviewed online in two waves. Weighting was then employed to balance demographics to ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. The precision of Ipsos online polls are calculated using a credibility interval.  In this case, the poll is accurate to +/- 3.5 percentage points of all Canadians. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.  For more information on credibility intervals, please visit the Ipsos website at http://ipsos-na.com/dl/pdf/research/public-affairs/IpsosPA_CredibilityIntervals.pdf.

Ipsos Reid is Canada's market intelligence leader and the country's leading provider of public opinion research. With operations in eight cities, Ipsos Reid employs more than 600 research professionals and support staff in Canada. The company has the biggest network of telephone call centres in Canada, as well as the largest pre-recruited household and on-line panels. Ipsos Reid's Canadian marketing research and public affairs practices are staffed with seasoned research consultants with extensive industry-specific backgrounds, offering the premier suite of research vehicles in Canada—all of which provide clients with actionable and relevant information. Ipsos Reid is an Ipsos company, a leading global survey-based market research group. To learn more, visit www.ipsos.ca

For copies of other news releases, please visit http://www.ipsos-na.com/news-polls/

For full tabular results, please visit our website at www.ipsos.ca.
News Releases are available at: http://www.ipsos-na.com/news/

The Canadian Journalism Foundation (CJF) is a non-profit organization that promotes excellence in journalism by celebrating outstanding journalistic achievement through an annual awards program; by operating journalism websites J-Source.ca (English) and ProjetJ.ca (French), in collaboration with the country's leading journalism schools; by organizing events that facilitate dialogue among journalists, business people, government officials, academics and students about the role of the media in Canadian society; and by fostering opportunities for journalism education, training and research.

For more about the CJF, please visit www.cjf-fjc.ca

SOURCE: Canadian Journalism Foundation

For further information:

For more information on this news release or The Canadian Journalism Foundation, please contact: 

John Wright
Senior Vice President
Ipsos Reid 
Public Affairs
(416)-324-2002

Natalie Turvey 
Executive Director 
The Canadian Journalism Foundation 
(416)-955-0394 ext. 501